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The Stability and Effectiveness of Climate Coalitions: A Comparative Analysis of Multiple Integrated Assessment Models

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  • Lessmann, Kai
  • Kornek, Ulrike
  • Dellink, Rob
  • Emmerling, Johannes
  • Eyckmans, Johan
  • Nagashima, Miyuki
  • Weikard, Hans-Peter
  • Yang, Zili

Abstract

In this paper we report results from a comparison of numerically calibrated game theoretic integrated assessment models that explore stability and performance of international coalitions for climate change mitigation. Specifically, by means of this ensemble of models we are able to identify robust results concerning incentives of nations to commit themselves to a climate agreement, and to estimate what stable agreements can achieve in terms of greenhouse gas mitigation. We also assess the potential of transfers that redistribute the surplus of cooperation in order to foster stability of climate coalitions. In contrast to much of the existing analytical game theoretical literature, we find substantial scope for self-enforcing climate coalitions in most models that close much of the abatement and welfare gap between complete absence of cooperation and full cooperation. This more positive message follows from the use of transfer schemes that are designed to counteract free riding incentives.

Suggested Citation

  • Lessmann, Kai & Kornek, Ulrike & Dellink, Rob & Emmerling, Johannes & Eyckmans, Johan & Nagashima, Miyuki & Weikard, Hans-Peter & Yang, Zili, 2014. "The Stability and Effectiveness of Climate Coalitions: A Comparative Analysis of Multiple Integrated Assessment Models," Climate Change and Sustainable Development 163598, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:feemcl:163598
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.163598
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Finus, Michael, 2008. "Game Theoretic Research on the Design of International Environmental Agreements: Insights, Critical Remarks, and Future Challenges," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 2(1), pages 29-67, June.
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    3. Hans-Peter Weikard & Michael Finus & Juan-Carlos Altamirano-Cabrera, 2006. "The impact of surplus sharing on the stability of international climate agreements," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 209-232, April.
    4. Thierry Bréchet & François Gerard & Henry Tulkens, 2011. "Efficiency vs. Stability in Climate Coalitions: A Conceptual and Computational Appraisal," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 49-76.
    5. Eyckmans, Johan & Finus, Michael & Mallozzi, Lina, 2011. "A New Class of Welfare Maximizing Stable Sharing Rules for Partition Function Games with Externalities," Working Papers 2011/08, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    6. Hans‐Peter Weikard, 2009. "Cartel Stability Under An Optimal Sharing Rule," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(5), pages 575-593, September.
    7. Zili Yang, 2008. "Strategic Bargaining and Cooperation in Greenhouse Gas Mitigations: An Integrated Assessment Modeling Approach," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262240548, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alban Thomas & Vera Zaporozhets, 2017. "Bargaining Over Environmental Budgets: A Political Economy Model with Application to French Water Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 68(2), pages 227-248, October.
    2. Jasper N. Meya & Ulrike Kornek & Kai Lessmann, 2018. "How empirical uncertainties influence the stability of climate coalitions," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 175-198, April.
    3. Acocella, Nicola & Di Giovanni, Tomasz, 2019. "Natural Resources and Environment Preservation: Strategic Substitutability vs. Complementarity in Global and Local Public Good Provision," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 13(3-4), pages 203-227, September.
    4. KORNEK, Urik & LESSMANN, Kai & TULKENS, Henry, 2014. "Transferable and non transferable utility implementations of coalitional stability in integrated assessment models," CORE Discussion Papers 2014035, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    5. Eric Bahel, 2018. "Cooperation and Subgame Perfect Equilibria in Global Pollution Problems with Critical Threshold," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 70(2), pages 457-481, June.
    6. Zili Yang, 2016. "Mitigation Cost And Climate Damage Versus Incentive Shifts Of Climate Coalition," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 7(04), pages 1-24, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory

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