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Evolution of Kenya's Maize Marketing Systems in the Post-Liberalization Era

Author

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  • Nyoro, James K.
  • Kiiru, M.W.
  • Jayne, Thom S.

Abstract

The objectives of this paper are to: (1) identify the pattern of private sector investment in the maize marketing system since the reforms were initiated and evaluate the extent of private sector response to the reforms; (2) assess how maize prices and marketing margins have changed in response to the market reforms; (3) identify market-oriented mechanisms that have evolved in the current environment to reduce vulnerability of farmers, traders and consumers to price and expenditure instability; and (4) identify strategies that the government and private sector could implement to effectively promote the development of the evolving market oriented food systems.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Nyoro, James K. & Kiiru, M.W. & Jayne, Thom S., 1999. "Evolution of Kenya's Maize Marketing Systems in the Post-Liberalization Era," Working Papers 202679, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:egtewp:202679
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/202679/files/tegemeo_workingpaper_2a.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jayne, T. S. & Chisvo, Munhamo, 1991. "Unravelling Zimbabwe's food insecurity paradox: Implications for grain market reform in Southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 319-329, August.
    2. Argwings-Kodhek, Gem & Jayne, Thomas S., 1996. "Relief through Development: Maize Market Liberalization in Urban Kenya," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11298, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Argwings-Kodhek, Gem & Mukumbu, Mulinge & Monke, Eric A., 1993. "The Impacts of Maize Market Liberalization in Kenya," Food Research Institute Studies, Stanford University, Food Research Institute, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-18.
    4. Jayne, T. S. & Rubey, Lawrence, 1993. "Maize milling, market reform and urban food security: The case of Zimbabwe," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 975-987, June.
    5. Jayne, T. S. & Argwings-Kodhek, Gem, 1997. "Consumer response to maize market liberalization in urban Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 447-458, October.
    6. Lele, Uma, 1990. "Structural adjustment, agricultural development and the poor: Some lessons from the Malawian experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 18(9), pages 1207-1219, September.
    7. Jayne, T. S. & Rukuni, Mandivamba, 1993. "Distributional effects of maize self-sufficiency in Zimbabwe: Implications for pricing and trade policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 334-341, August.
    8. Pinckney, Thomas C., 1993. "Is market liberalization compatible with food security? : Storage, trade and price policies for maize in Southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 325-333, August.
    9. Jayne, T S, 1994. "Do High Food Marketing Costs Constrain Cash Crop Production? Evidence from Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 387-402, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Winter-Nelson, Alex & Argwings-Kodhek, Gem, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Kenya," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper Series 48521, World Bank.
    2. Jayne, Thomas S. & Yamano, Takashi & Nyoro, James K. & Awuor, Tom, 2000. "Do Farmers Really Benefit from High Food Prices? Balancing Rural Interests in Kenya's Maize Pricing and Marketing Policy," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54641, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Omamo, Steven Were & Mose, Lawrence O., 2001. "Fertilizer trade under market liberalization: preliminary evidence from Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 1-10, February.
    4. Jayne, T. S. & Govereh, J. & Mwanaumo, A. & Nyoro, J. K. & Chapoto, A., 2002. "False Promise or False Premise? The Experience of Food and Input Market Reform in Eastern and Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1967-1985, November.
    5. Kirimi, Lilian & Sitko, Nicholas & Jayne, Thom S. & Karin, Francis & Muyanga, Milu & Sheahan, Megan & Flock, James & Bor, Gilbert, 2011. "A Farm Gate-to-Consumer Value Chain Analysis of Kenya's Maize Marketing System," Working Papers 202597, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    6. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thomas S. & Njukia, Stephen, 2010. "Staple food prices in Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 58559, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Jayne, Thomas S. & Meyers, Robert J. & Nyoro, James K., 2005. "Effects of Government Maize Marketing and Trade Policies on Maize Market Prices in Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55162, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Wanzala, Maria N. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Staatz, John M. & Mugera, Amin W. & Kirimi, Justus & Owuor, Joseph, 2001. "Agricultural Production Incentives: Fertilizer Markets and Insights from Kenya," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55150, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. T. S. Jayne & Robert J. Myers & James Nyoro, 2008. "The effects of NCPB marketing policies on maize market prices in Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 313-325, May.
    10. Nyoro, James K. & Kirimi, Lilian & Jayne, Thom S., 2004. "Competitiveness of Kenyan and Ugandan Maize Production: Challenges for the Future," Working Papers 202669, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    11. Mather, David & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "The Impact of State Marketing Board Operations on Smallholder Behavior and Incomes: The Case of Kenya," Food Security International Development Working Papers 120742, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    12. Tavneet Suri, 2009. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," NBER Working Papers 15346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Leavy, Jennifer & Colin, Poulton, 2008. "Commercialisations in Agriculture," Ethiopian Journal of Economics, Ethiopian Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 116-116, May.
    14. Nyoro, James K. & Ariga, Joshua, 2004. "Preparation of an Inventory of Research Work Undertaken in Agricultural/Rural Sector in Kenya," Working Papers 202629, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    15. Tavneet Suri, 2006. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Working Papers 944, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    16. Nyoro, James K. & Wanzala, Maria N. & Awuor, Tom, 2001. "Increasing Kenya's Agricultural Competitiveness: Farm Level Issues," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55151, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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