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Traceability and Labelling of GMOs as a Framework for Risk Management in European Regulation


  • Charlier, Christophe


Traceability and labelling are required by European regulation for food produced from GMOs. For this regulation one of the main advantages of traceability consists in providing information that should allow the precise withdrawal of products from the production process. This paper tests this idea. For that purpose, it seeks to establish whether the mandatory traceability will create an information set refined enough to locate GMO products in the production process. In this respect, the limits of the European regulation are pointed out. It is shown however that results are improved as soon as labelling is introduced alongside the requirement of traceability.

Suggested Citation

  • Charlier, Christophe, 2005. "Traceability and Labelling of GMOs as a Framework for Risk Management in European Regulation," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24700, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae05:24700

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Crespi & Stéphan Marette, 2003. "“Does Contain” vs. “Does Not Contain”: Does it Matter which GMO Label is Used?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 327-344, November.
    2. Caswell, Julie A., 1998. "How Labeling of Safety and Process Attributes Affects Markets for Food," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 27(02), pages 151-158, October.
    3. Murray Fulton & Konstantinos Giannakas, 2004. "Inserting GM Products into the Food Chain: The Market and Welfare Effects of Different Labeling and Regulatory Regimes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 42-60.
    4. Charles Noussair & StÈphane Robin & Bernard Ruffieux, 2004. "Do Consumers Really Refuse To Buy Genetically Modified Food?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(492), pages 102-120, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shi Zheng & Pei Xu & Zhigang Wang & Shunfeng Song, 2012. "Willingness to pay for traceable pork: evidence from Beijing, China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 200-215, May.
    2. Charlier, Christophe & Valceschini, Egizio, 2006. "Traceability, Trust and Coordination in a Food Chain," 99th Seminar, February 8-10, 2006, Bonn, Germany 7718, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item


    traceability; labelling; GMO; risk management; food safety; Risk and Uncertainty; I18; K32; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy


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