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Traceability, Trust and Coordination in a Food Chain

  • Charlier, Christophe
  • Valceschini, Egizio

In response to sanitary crisis, risk management has become a central issue for food producers and distributors in Europe. Organisational responses to sanitary risks usually implying traceability have been conceived by firms. One of the main tasks here is to deal with coordination of the different operators of a food chain. The European Union has developed a regulatory framework with the Regulation 178/2002. This regulation sets a mandatory traceability considered as a risk management tool. Traceability that was considered as a private initiative has therefore become an obligation with this regulation. This paper tries to evaluate if the problem of the operators’ coordination on specific traceability practices that any private organisational of a food chain had to face is solved with the strict application of the Regulation 178/2002. For that, the analysis characterises the mandatory traceability and the operators’ responsibilities set by the regulation. The coordination task and the problem of trust that it contains is then described. The analysis shows the limits of the mandatory traceability in this context and suggests a solution.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/7718
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Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 99th Seminar, February 8-10, 2006, Bonn, Germany with number 7718.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae99:7718
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  1. Golan, Elise H. & Krissoff, Barry & Kuchler, Fred & Calvin, Linda & Nelson, Kenneth E. & Price, Gregory K., 2004. "Traceability In The U.S. Food Supply: Economic Theory And Industry Studies," Agricultural Economics Reports 33939, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Caswell, Julie A., 2005. "The Economics of Traceability for Multi-Ingredient Products: A Network Approach," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19143, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Bullock, D. S. & Desquilbet, M., 2002. "The economics of non-GMO segregation and identity preservation," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 81-99, February.
  4. Charlier, Christophe, 2005. "Traceability and Labelling of GMOs as a Framework for Risk Management in European Regulation," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24700, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  5. Hennessy, David A. & Roosen, Jutta & Jensen, Helen H., 2003. "Systemic failure in the provision of safe food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 77-96, February.
  6. Hennessy, David A. & Roosen, Jutta & Miranowski, John, 2001. "Leadership and the Provision of Safe Food," Staff General Research Papers 10549, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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