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On the Relationship between Lifestyle and Happiness in the UK

Listed author(s):
  • Gschwandtner, Adelina
  • Jewell, Sarah L.
  • Kambhampati, Uma

In the present paper we attempt to analyse the relationship between ‘lifestyle’ and happiness in the UK using an instrumental variable approach. Our lifestyle variables have a significantly positive impact on happiness and the impact increases with the use of instruments. This suggests that a ‘healthy lifestyle’ has a positive impact on happiness and that any policy improving our lifestyle proxies would also make people happier in the UK.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/204199
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Paper provided by Agricultural Economics Society in its series 89th Annual Conference, April 13-15, 2015, Warwick University, Coventry, UK with number 204199.

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Date of creation: Apr 2015
Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc15:204199
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.aes.ac.uk/
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