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The Impact of Food Safety Third-Party Certifications on China’s Food Exports to the United States

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  • Zheng, Yuqing
  • Muth, Mary
  • Brophy, Jenna

Abstract

In this paper, we empirically examine the relationship between food safety TPC on a country’s food exports to the United States using data for 2010. We developed a modified gravity model to account for the role TPC plays in facilitating international food trade. we found that a 10% increase in the number of sites/facilities certified to ISO 22000, GLOBALGAP, and BRC is associated with an increase of a country’s food exports to the United States in the ranges of 0 to 6.7%, 1.6 to 2.2%, and 2 to 3.3%, respectively. For the case of China, we found that each additional ISO, GLOBALGAP, and BRC certification in China can increase China’s exports to the United States up to $472,562, $2,907,451, and $1,927,383, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng, Yuqing & Muth, Mary & Brophy, Jenna, 2013. "The Impact of Food Safety Third-Party Certifications on China’s Food Exports to the United States," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149926, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:149926
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mohammed, Rezgar & Zheng, Yuqing, 2017. "International Diffusion Of Food Safety Standards: The Role Of Domestic Certifiers And International Trade," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, pages 296-322.
    2. Seok, Jun Ho & Reed, Michael Robert & Saghaian, Sayed, 3. "The Impact Of Sqf Certification On U.S. Agri-Food Exports," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 4(3).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; food exports; food safety; third-party certifications; international trade; Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; International Relations/Trade; Q17; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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