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Succession In Family Farm Business: Empirical Evidence From The U.S. Farm Sector

  • Mishra, Ashok K.
  • El-Osta, Hisham S.
  • Johnson, James D.

Survival of many family farms is dependent on successful intergenerational transfer. Given the importance of succession in the farm sector, the purpose of this paper is to examine factors that are likely to influence succession decisions on U.S. farms. The paper uses 2001 ARMS data and a multinomial Logit (MNL) regression to estimate family succession, non-family succession, and farm exit decisions of farm households in the U.S. Model choice and specification issues are discussed. Results indicate that operatorÂ’'s education, household wealth, growth in farm size, and farm debt are important factors that determine succession decisions. Additionally, farm specialization is taken into consideration when farm operators make their succession plans.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20114
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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO with number 20114.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20114
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  1. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages S151-82, July.
  2. Guinnane, Timothy W., 1992. "Intergenerational transfers, emigration, and the rural Irish household system," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 456-476, October.
  3. Ayal Kimhi & Noga Nachlieli, 2001. "Intergenerational Succession on Israeli Family Farms," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 42-58.
  4. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Avia Spivak, 1979. "The Family as an Incomplete Annuities Market," NBER Working Papers 0362, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. McElroy, Marjorie B, 1985. "The Joint Determination of Household Membership and Market Work: The Case of Young Men," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(3), pages 293-316, July.
  6. Tweeten, Luther G. & Zulauf, Carl R., 1994. "Is farm operator succession a problem?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 9(2).
  7. Nerlove, Marc & Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1984. "Investment in Human and Nonhuman Capital, Transfers among Siblings, and the Role of Government," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(5), pages 1191-98, September.
  8. Ashok K. Mishra & Carmen L. Sandretto, 2002. "Stability of Farm Income and the Role of Nonfarm Income in U.S. Agriculture," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 24(1), pages 208-221.
  9. David Altig & Steve J. Davis, 1989. "The timing of intergenerational transfers, tax policy, and aggregate savings," Working Paper 8917, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  10. Cox, Donald, 1987. "Motives for Private Income Transfers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 508-46, June.
  11. Pesquin, Claudio & Kimhi, Ayal & Kislev, Yoav, 1999. "Old Age Security and Inter-Generational Transfer of Family Farms," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 19-37, March.
  12. Ashok K. Mishra & Barry K. Goodwin, 1997. "Farm Income Variability and the Supply of Off-Farm Labor," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 880-887.
  13. Ellen Goddard & Alfons Weersink & Kevin Chen & Calum G. Turvey, 1993. "Economics of Structural Change in Agriculture," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 41(4), pages 475-489, December.
  14. McElroy, Marjorie B & Horney, Mary Jean, 1981. "Nash-Bargained Household Decisions: Toward a Generalization of the Theory of Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(2), pages 333-49, June.
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