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Political Crises and Risk of Financial Contagion in Developing Countries: Evidence from Africa

  • Asongu Simplice

    ()

    (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

The recent waves of political crises in Africa and the Middle East have inspired the debate over how political instability could pose a risk of financial contagion to emerging countries. With retrospect to the Kenyan political crisis, our findings suggest stock markets in Lebanon, Mauritius were contaminated while Nigeria experienced a positive spillover. Our results have two major implications. Firstly, we have confirmed existing consensus that African financial markets are increasingly integrated. Secondly, we have also shown that international financial market transmissions not only occur during financial crisis; political crises effects should not be undermined.

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File URL: http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/Political-crises-in-Africa-and-risk-of-financial-contagion.pdf
File Function: Revised version, 2013
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Paper provided by African Governance and Development Institute. in its series Working Papers with number 11/003.

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Length: 14
Date of creation: 04 Apr 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in the Journal of Economics and International Finance
Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:11/003
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  1. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 1996. "Currency crashes in emerging markets: an empirical treatment," International Finance Discussion Papers 534, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. King, Mervyn A & Wadhwani, Sushil, 1990. "Transmission of Volatility between Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 5-33.
  3. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1993. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America: The Role of External Factors," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(1), pages 108-151, March.
  4. King, Mervyn & Sentana, Enrique & Wadhwani, Sushil, 1994. "Volatility and Links between National Stock Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(4), pages 901-33, July.
  5. Simplice A., Asongu, 2011. "The 2011 Japanese earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis: evidence of contagion from international financial markets," MPRA Paper 31174, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Kristin Forbes, 2000. "The Asian Flu and Russian Virus: Firm-level Evidence on How Crises are Transmitted Internationally," NBER Working Papers 7807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Kristin Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 1999. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Co-movements," NBER Working Papers 7267, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Maurice Obstfeld, 1984. "Rational and Self-Fulfilling Balance-of-Payments Crises," NBER Working Papers 1486, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Lee, Hsien-Yi & Wu, Hsing-Chi & Wang, Yung-Jang, 2007. "Contagion effect in financial markets after the South-East Asia Tsunami," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 281-296, June.
  10. Collins, Daryl & Biekpe, Nicholas, 2003. "Contagion: a fear for African equity markets?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 285-297.
  11. Haile, Fasika & Pozo, Susan, 2008. "Currency crisis contagion and the identification of transmission channels," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 572-588, October.
  12. Simplice A. ASONGU, 2012. "Globalization, Financial Crisis And Contagion: Time - Dynamic Evidence From Financial Markets Of Developing Countries," Journal of Advanced Studies in Finance, ASERS Publishing, vol. 0(2), pages 131-139, January.
  13. Angelos Kanas, . "Linkages between the US and European Equity Markets: Further Evidence from cointegration Tests," Working Papers 9804, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
  14. Sergio L. Schmukler, 2004. "Financial globalization: gain and pain for developing countries," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 2, pages 39 - 66.
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