IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/6820.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Accounting for Chinese Trade: Some National and Regional Considerations

In: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting

Author

Listed:
  • K. C. Fung

Abstract

China's trade has three features: high incidence of re-exports through Hong Kong, high degree of trade related to foreign investment, and large amount of `illegal' trade. Re-exports occur when imports to Hong Kong are consigned to a buyer in Hong Kong, who adds a markup, and exports the goods elsewhere without fundamentally changing the goods. Using U.S. data and accounting for re-exports, the U.S.-China trade balance has to be lowered by 35 percent. Foreign investments in China accounted for 45 percent of China's exports. Foreign investments include foreign direct investment (FDI) and foreign subcontracting. `Illegal' trade between China and Taiwan has been induced by Taiwan's `no direct trade' policy. Illegal trade such as smuggling and tariff evasion also affect China's trade with her other trading partners.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • K. C. Fung, 1998. "Accounting for Chinese Trade: Some National and Regional Considerations," NBER Chapters,in: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting, pages 173-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6820
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c6820.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yue-Chim Richard Wong, 1995. "China'S Economic Reform: The Next Step," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 13(1), pages 18-27, January.
    2. Robert E. Baldwin & Douglas Nelson, 1993. "The Political Economy of U.S.-Taiwanese Trade and Other International Economic Relations," NBER Chapters,in: Trade and Protectionism, NBER-EASE Volume 2, pages 307-337 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Magnus Blomstrom & Irving B. Kravis & Robert E. Lipsey, 1988. "Multinational Firms and Manufactured Exports from Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 2493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Marcus Noland, 1995. "China and the International Economic System," Working Paper Series WP95-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    5. Ito, Takatoshi & Krueger, Anne O. (ed.), 1993. "Trade and Protectionism," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226386683.
    6. Takatoshi Ito & Anne O. Krueger, 1993. "Trade and Protectionism, NBER-EASE Volume 2," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number ito_93-2.
    7. Anonymous & Brandão, Antônio Salazar P., 1993. "Special Issue: Trade and Development," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Noland, Marcus, 1996. "Trade, investment, and economic conflict between the United States and Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 435-458.
    2. Robert C. Feenstra, 1999. "Discrepancies in International Data: An Application to China-Hong Kong Entrepot Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 338-343.
    3. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Harry P. Bowen, 1997. "World Trade Flows, 1970-1992, with Production and Tariff Data," NBER Working Papers 5910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Jorda, Oscar, 1999. "Random-Time Aggregation in Partial Adjustment Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, pages 382-395.
    5. Fung, K. C., 2005. "Trade and Investment among China, the United States, and the Asia-Pacific Economies: An Invited Testimony to the U.S. Congressional Commission," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt15x564x2, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    6. Xiaohui Liu & Chang Shu, 2003. "Determinants of Export Performance: Evidence from Chinese Industries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, pages 45-67.
    7. Wang, Zhi & Gehlhar, Mark & Yao, Shunli, 2010. "A globally consistent framework for reliability-based trade statistics reconciliation in the presence of an entrepôt," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 161-189, March.
    8. Fernald, John & Edison, Hali & Loungani, Prakash, 1999. "Was China the first domino? Assessing links between China and other Asian economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 515-535, August.
    9. Robert C. Feenstra & Wen Hai & Wing T. Woo & Shunli Yao, "undated". "The U.S.-China Bilateral Trade Balance: It'S Size And Determinants," Department of Economics 98-09, California Davis - Department of Economics.
    10. Fung, K. C. & Lau, Lawrence J., 2001. "New Estimates of the United States-China BilateralTrade Balances," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, pages 102-130.
    11. Elissa Braunstein & Gerald Epstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-13, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    12. Huang, Yanghua & Salike, Nimesh & Zhong, Feiteng, 2014. "Policy Effect on Structural Change: A Case of Chinese Intermediate Goods Trade," RIEI Working Papers 2014-02, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Research Institute for Economic Integration.
    13. Zhang, Kevin Honglin & Song, Shunfeng, 2001. "Promoting exports: the role of inward FDI in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 385-396.
    14. Kadochnikov, Pavel & Ptashkina, Maria, 2014. "The liberalization of foreign trade in China: Meeting the Challenges of the beginning of the 1990s," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, pages 103-113, December.
    15. John G. Fernald & Hali J. Edison & Prakash Loungani, 1998. "Was China the first domino? assessing links between China and the rest of emerging Asia," International Finance Discussion Papers 604, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    16. Zhi Wang & Mark Gehlhar & Shunli Yao, 2007. "A Globally Consistent Framework for Reliability-based Trade Statistics Reconciliation in the Presence of an Entrepôt," Trade Working Papers 22715, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    17. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:30-47 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6820. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.