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Was China the first domino? Assessing links between China and other Asian economies

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  • Fernald, John
  • Edison, Hali
  • Loungani, Prakash

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  • Fernald, John & Edison, Hali & Loungani, Prakash, 1999. "Was China the first domino? Assessing links between China and other Asian economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 515-535, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:18:y:1999:i:4:p:515-535
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anuradha Dayal-Gulati & Valerie Cerra, 1999. "China's Trade Flows; Changing Price Sensitivies and the Reform Process," IMF Working Papers 99/1, International Monetary Fund.
    2. David Burton & Wanda S Tseng & Kalpana Kochhar & Hoe Ee Khor & Dubravko Mihaljek, 1994. "Economic Reform in China; A New Phase," IMF Occasional Papers 114, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Marcus Noland & Li-Gang Liu & Sherman Robinson, 1998. "Global Economic Effects of the Asian Currency Devaluations," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa56.
    4. Robert C. Feenstra & Wen Hai & Wing T. Woo & Shunli Yao, "undated". "The U.S.-China Bilateral Trade Balance: It'S Size And Determinants," Department of Economics 98-09, California Davis - Department of Economics.
    5. Chan, K. Hung & Chow, Lynne, 1997. "An empirical study of tax audits in China on international transfer pricing," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 83-112, May.
    6. Li-Gang Liu & Marcus Noland & Sherman Robinson & Zhi Wang, 1998. "Asian Competitive Devaluations," Working Paper Series wp98-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    7. K. C. Fung, 1998. "Accounting for Chinese Trade: Some National and Regional Considerations," NBER Chapters,in: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting, pages 173-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Kasa, Kenneth & Huh, Chan, 2001. "A Dynamic Model of Export Competition, Policy Coordination, and Simultaneous Currency Collapse," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 68-80, February.
    9. Loungani, Prakash, 1996. "Macroeconomic effects of labor reallocation A comment," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 117-124, June.
    10. John G. Fernald & Oliver D. Babson, 1999. "Why has China survived the Asian crisis so well? What risks remain?," International Finance Discussion Papers 633, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. Marc G Quintyn & Bernard J Laurens & Hassanali Mehran & Tom Nordman, 1996. "Monetary and Exchange System Reforms in China; An Experiment in Gradualism," IMF Occasional Papers 141, International Monetary Fund.
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