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Nationalism and Economic Exchange: Evidence from Shocks to Sino-Japanese Relations

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  • Raymond Fisman
  • Yasushi Hamao
  • Yongxiang Wang

Abstract

We study the impact of nationalism and interstate frictions on international economic relations by analyzing market reaction to adverse shocks to Sino-Japanese relations in 2005 and 2010. Japanese companies with high China exposure suffer relative declines during each event window; a symmetric effect is observed for Chinese companies with high Japanese exposure. The effect on Japanese companies is more pronounced for those operating in industries dominated by Chinese state-owned enterprises, whereas firms with high Chinese employment experience lower declines. These results emphasize the role of countries' economic and political institutions in mediating the impact of interstate frictions on firm-level outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymond Fisman & Yasushi Hamao & Yongxiang Wang, 2014. "Nationalism and Economic Exchange: Evidence from Shocks to Sino-Japanese Relations," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(9), pages 2626-2660.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:27:y:2014:i:9:p:2626-2660.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhu017
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    Cited by:

    1. Lorenzo Rotunno & Pierre-Louis Vézina, 2017. "Israel’s open-secret trade," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 153(2), pages 233-248, May.
    2. repec:eee:corfin:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:207-231 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. TANAKA Ayumu & ITO Banri & WAKASUGI Ryuhei, 2017. "How Do Exporters Respond to Exogenous Shocks: Evidence from Japanese firm-level data," Discussion papers 17027, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. He, Yinghua & Nielsson, Ulf & Wang, Yonglei, 2017. "Hurting without hitting: The economic cost of political tension," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 106-124.
    5. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli & Jiabin Wu, 2016. "The Interplay of Cultural Aversion and Assortativity for the Emergence of Cooperation," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 121, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Davis, Christina & Fuchs, Andreas & Johnson , Kristina, 2014. "State Control and the Effects of Foreign Relations on Bilateral Trade," Working Papers 0576, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    7. repec:eee:inecon:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:211-225 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Lin, Faqin & Hu, Cui & Fuchs, Andreas, 2016. "How Do Firms Respond to Political Tensions? The Heterogeneity of the Dalai Lama Effect on Trade," Working Papers 0628, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    9. Alessandro Belmonte & Michael Rochlitz, 2018. "The Political Economy of Collective Memories: Evidence from Russian Politics," HSE Working papers WP BRP 59/PS/2018, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    10. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli & Jiabin Wuz, 2016. "The Interplay of Cultural Aversion and Assortativity for the Emergence of Cooperation," Department of Economics 0084, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    11. Tom Coupe & Oleksandr Shepotylo, 2017. "Country Reputation and Trade Policy Preferences - Using the News of the Election of Donald Trump as an Instrument," Working Papers in Economics 17/08, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    12. Zijun Luo & Yonghong Zhou, 2016. "Gainers and Losers of Political Instability: Evidence from the Anti-Japanese Demonstration in China," Working Papers 1608, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
    13. Hendel, Igal E & Lach, Saul & Spiegel, Yossi, 2015. "Consumers' Activism: the Facebook boycott of Cottage Cheese," CEPR Discussion Papers 10460, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Fuchs, Andreas, 2016. "China’s Economic Diplomacy and the Politics-Trade Nexus," Working Papers 0609, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    15. Heilmann, Kilian, 2016. "Does political conflict hurt trade? Evidence from consumer boycotts," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 179-191.
    16. repec:eee:eecrev:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:1-18 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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