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Leisure and Subjective Well-being

In: Handbook on the Economics of Leisure

Author

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  • Victoria Ateca-Amestoy

Abstract

Surprisingly, the field of leisure economics is not, thus far, a particularly integrated or coherent one. In this Handbook a wide ranging body of international scholars get to grips with the core issues, taking in the traditional income/leisure choice model of textbook microeconomics and Becker’s allocation of time model along the way. They expertly apply economics to some usually neglected topics, such as boredom and sleeping, work–life balance, dating, tourism, health and fitness, sport, video games, social networking, music festivals and sex. Contributions from further afield by Veblen, Sctivosky and Bourdieu also feature prominently.

Suggested Citation

  • Victoria Ateca-Amestoy, 2011. "Leisure and Subjective Well-being," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Leisure, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13469_4
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848444041.00010.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Victoria Ateca-Amestoy & Mariana Gerstenblüth & Irene Mussio & Máximo Rossi, 2016. "How do cultural activities influence happiness? Investigating the relationship between self-reported well-being and leisure," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 31(2), pages 217-234.
    2. Daniel Wheatley & Craig Bickerton, 2017. "Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 41(1), pages 23-45, February.

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