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How do Cultural Activities Influence Happiness? The Relation Between Self-Reported Well-Being and Leisure

Author

Listed:
  • Victoria Ateca-Amestoy

    () (Universidad del País Vasco)

  • Mariana Gerstenblüth

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Irene Mussio

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Máximo Rossi

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

Well-being, measured as self-reported happiness has many determinants, which range from gender to income and political affiliation. When it comes to more or less active ways of participating in cultural activities, leisure has a significant impact in the levels of reported happiness, which is in line with the proposed ideas of Stiglitz et al (2009). We also quantify the likelihood of being more or less happy in relation to different types of leisure activities. Our approach has the advantage that all these cultural activities can be considered at the same time, accounting for the individual impact of each on individual happiness levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Victoria Ateca-Amestoy & Mariana Gerstenblüth & Irene Mussio & Máximo Rossi, 2014. "How do Cultural Activities Influence Happiness? The Relation Between Self-Reported Well-Being and Leisure," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0614, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:0614
    as

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    File URL: http://cienciassociales.edu.uy/departamentodeeconomia/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/11/0614.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    happiness; leisure; culture; well-being;

    JEL classification:

    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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