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How do cultural activities influence happiness? Investigating the relationship between self-reported well-being and leisure

Listed author(s):
  • Victoria Ateca-Amestoy

    (Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea)

  • Mariana Gerstenblüth

    (Universidad de la República de Uruguay)

  • Irene Mussio

    (Universidad de la República de Uruguay)

  • Máximo Rossi

    (Universidad de la República de Uruguay)

Leisure is a human condition related to the discretionary use of time in a rewarding way that contributes to individual well-being. Individuals decide to engage on cultural activities to enjoy pleasant experiences. Cultural participation can be explained in different dimension, considering how the individual access those cultural experiences: by live attendance, by home consumption, by community practice. We find that the magnitude of the positive effect of cultural activities on the top happiness goes in this descending order: cinema going, participat- ing in cultural events,listening to music,reading books and watching TV.

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File URL: http://estudioseconomicos.colmex.mx/archivo/EstudiosEconomicos2016/217-234.pdf
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Article provided by El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos in its journal Estudios Económicos.

Volume (Year): 31 (2016)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 217-234

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Handle: RePEc:emx:esteco:v:31:y:2016:i:1:p:217-234
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.colmex.mx/centros/cee/

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  6. repec:pri:cepsud:125krueger is not listed on IDEAS
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