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Léa Rouanet

Personal Details

First Name:Léa
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rouanet
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pro568
https://sites.google.com/site/learouanet/
Terminal Degree: Paris School of Economics (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

World Bank Group

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.worldbank.org/

: (202) 477-1234

1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
RePEc:edi:wrldbus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Eliana Carranza & Aletheia Donald & Rachel Jones & Léa Rouanet, 2017. "Time and Money," World Bank Other Operational Studies 27951, The World Bank.
  2. Pauline Rossi & Léa Rouanet, 2014. "Gender Preferences in Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Fertility Choices," Working Papers 2014-33, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  3. Rouanet, Léa, 2011. "The Double African Paradox: What does selective mortality tell us?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 71, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  4. Denis Cogneau & Léa Rouanet, 2011. "Living conditions in Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana 1925-1985: What Do Survey Data on Height Stature Tell Us," Post-Print halshs-00754697, HAL.
  5. Denis Cogneau & Léa Rouanet, 2009. "Living Conditions in Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and Western Africa 1925-1985: What Do Survey Data on Height Stature Tell Us?," Working Papers DT/2009/12, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).

Articles

  1. Rossi, Pauline & Rouanet, Léa, 2015. "Gender Preferences in Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Fertility Choices," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 326-345.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Pauline Rossi & Léa Rouanet, 2014. "Gender Preferences in Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Fertility Choices," Working Papers 2014-33, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.

    Cited by:

    1. Pauline Rossi, 2016. "Strategic Choices in Polygamous Households: Theory and Evidence from Senegal," CINCH Working Paper Series 1601, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Jan 2016.
    2. Javed, Rashid & Mughal, Mazhar, 2018. "Have a son, gain a voice: Son preference and female participation in household decision making," EconStor Preprints 179520, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    3. Martin Flatø, 2018. "The Differential Mortality of Undesired Infants in Sub-Saharan Africa," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(1), pages 271-294, February.
    4. Basedau, Matthias & Gobien, Simone & Prediger, Sebastian, 2017. "The Ambivalent Role of Religion for Sustainable Development: A Review of the Empirical Evidence," GIGA Working Papers 297, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    5. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2018. "A Theory of Social Norms, Women's Time Allocation, and Gender Inequality in the Process of Development," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 237, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    6. Matthias Basedau & Simone Gobien & Sebastian Prediger, 2017. "The Ambivalent Role of Religion for Sustainable Development: A Review of the Empirical Evidence," GIGA Working Paper Series 297, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    7. Kenneth Harttgen & Stefan Lang & Johannes Seiler, 2017. "Selective mortality and undernutrition in low- and middle-income countries," Working Papers 2017-27, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, revised Aug 2018.

  2. Rouanet, Léa, 2011. "The Double African Paradox: What does selective mortality tell us?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 71, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kalle Hirvonen, 2013. "Measuring catch-up growth in malnourished populations," Working Paper Series 5913, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.

  3. Denis Cogneau & Léa Rouanet, 2011. "Living conditions in Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana 1925-1985: What Do Survey Data on Height Stature Tell Us," Post-Print halshs-00754697, HAL.

    Cited by:

    1. Denis Cogneau & Kenneth Houngbedji & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2016. "The fall of the elephant. Two decades of poverty increase in Côte d’Ivoire (1988-2008)," Post-Print hal-01288423, HAL.
    2. Bokang Mpeta & Johan Fourie & Kris Inwood, 2017. "Black living standards in South Africa before democracy: New evidence from heights," Working Papers 670, Economic Research Southern Africa.

  4. Denis Cogneau & Léa Rouanet, 2009. "Living Conditions in Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and Western Africa 1925-1985: What Do Survey Data on Height Stature Tell Us?," Working Papers DT/2009/12, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Gaisie, 2017. "Living standards in pre-independent Ghana: evidence from household budgets," HHB Working Papers Series 7, The Historical Household Budgets Project.
    2. Jerven, Morten & Austin, Gareth & Green, Erik & Uche, Chibuike & Frankema, Ewout & Fourie, Johan & Inikori, Joseph & Moradi, Alexander & Hillbom, Ellen, 2012. "Moving Forward in African Economic History. Bridging the Gap Between Methods and Sources," Lund Papers in Economic History 124, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    3. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro, 2011. "Human Development in Africa: A Long-run Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 8586, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Akachi, Yoko & Canning, David, 2010. "Health trends in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conflicting evidence from infant mortality rates and adult heights," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 273-288, July.
    5. Camelia Minoiu & Olga N. Shemyakina, 2012. "Armed conflict, household victimization, and child health in Côte d'Ivoire," Working Papers 245, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

Articles

  1. Rossi, Pauline & Rouanet, Léa, 2015. "Gender Preferences in Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Fertility Choices," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 326-345.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (3) 2010-03-06 2011-07-27 2015-08-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2010-03-06 2011-07-27. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-07-27. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2015-08-19. Author is listed
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2010-03-06. Author is listed

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