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James Rockey

Personal Details

First Name:James
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rockey
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pro439
Terminal Degree:2008 School of Economics, Finance and Management; University of Bristol (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Leicester University

Leicester, United Kingdom
http://www.le.ac.uk/economics/

: +44 (0)116 252 2887
+44 (0)116 252 2908
University Road. Leicester. LE1 7RH
RePEc:edi:deleiuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Laura A. Harvey & Jochen O. Mierau & James Rockey, 2017. "Inequality in an Equal Society," LWS Working papers 26, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
  2. Tewodros Makonnen Gebrewolde & James Rockey, 2017. "The Global Gender Gap in Labor Income," Discussion Papers in Economics 17/14, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  3. De Fraja, Gianni & Lemos, Sara & Rockey, James, 2017. "The Wounds That Do Not Heal. The Life-time Scar of Youth Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 11852, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Tewodros Makonnen Gebrewolde & James Rockey, 2016. "The Effectiveness of Industrial Policy in Developing Countries: Causal Evidence from Ethiopian Manufacturing Firms," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/07, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  5. Daniel Ladley & Guanqing Liu & James Rockey, 2016. "Margin Trading: Hedonic Returns and Real Losses," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/06, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  6. James Rockey & Jonathan Temple, 2015. "Growth Econometrics for Agnostics and True Believers," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/656, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  7. Lockwood, Ben & Rockey, James, 2015. "Negative Voters: Electoral Competition with Loss-Aversion," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1063, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  8. Jochen O. Mierau & James Rockey, 2015. "Inequality in an Equal Society: Theory and Evidence," Discussion Papers in Economics 15/23, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  9. Andrew C. Pickering & James Rockey, 2012. "Ideology and the growth of US state government," Working Papers 2012/6, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  10. James Rockey, 2010. "Reconsidering the Fiscal Effects of Constitutions," Discussion Papers in Economics 10/16, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  11. Daniel Ladley & James Rockey, 2010. "Party Formation and Competition," Discussion Papers in Economics 10/17, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  12. James Rockey, 2009. "Who is left-wing, and who just thinks they are?," Discussion Papers in Economics 09/23, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  13. James C. Rockey, 2007. "Which Democracies Pay Higher Wages?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 07/600, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  14. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2007. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 07/599, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

Articles

  1. Rockey, James & Temple, Jonathan, 2016. "Growth econometrics for agnostics and true believers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 86-102.
  2. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.
  3. Rockey, James, 2012. "Reconsidering the fiscal effects of constitutions," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 313-323.
  4. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2011. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 907-919, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. James Rockey, 2009. "Who is left-wing, and who just thinks they are?," Discussion Papers in Economics 09/23, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Do people think of themselves as further left than they really are?
      by Chris Bertram in Crooked Timber on 2010-08-02 22:36:40

Working papers

  1. James Rockey & Jonathan Temple, 2015. "Growth Econometrics for Agnostics and True Believers," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/656, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. David I. Stern & Jeremy van Dijk, 2016. "Economic growth and global particulate pollution concentrations," CCEP Working Papers 1604, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Nadir Altinok & Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2016. "Does one size fit all? The impact of cognitive skills on economic growth," Working Papers of BETA 2016-34, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    3. David I. Stern, 2017. "The environmental Kuznets curve after 25 years," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 7-28, April.
    4. Steel, Mark F. J., 2017. "Model Averaging and its Use in Economics," MPRA Paper 81568, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Duygu Yolcu Karadam & Erdal Özmen, 2016. "Real Exchange Rates and Growth," ERC Working Papers 1609, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Sep 2016.

  2. Lockwood, Ben & Rockey, James, 2015. "Negative Voters: Electoral Competition with Loss-Aversion," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1063, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Khani Hoolari, Seyed Morteza & Taghinejad Omran, Vahid, 2017. "Natural Budget Deficit and Natural Political Cyclicality," MPRA Paper 78107, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Nunnari, Salvatore & Zapal, Jan, 2017. "A Model of Focusing in Political Choice," CEPR Discussion Papers 12407, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Carlos Viana de Carvalho & Eduardo Zilberman & Ruy Ribeiro, "undated". "Sentiment, Electoral Uncertainty and Stock Returns," Textos para discussão 655, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).

  3. Andrew C. Pickering & James Rockey, 2012. "Ideology and the growth of US state government," Working Papers 2012/6, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.

  4. James Rockey, 2010. "Reconsidering the Fiscal Effects of Constitutions," Discussion Papers in Economics 10/16, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

    Cited by:

    1. James Rockey & Miltiadis Makris, 2010. "Which Democracies Pay Higher Wages?," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/09, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    2. German Caruso & Carlos Scartascini & Mariano Tommasi, 2013. "Are We All Playing the Same Game? The Economic Effects of Constitutions Depend on the Degree of Institutionalization," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-237, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Florian Ade, 2014. "Do constitutions matter? Evidence from a natural experiment at the municipality level," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(3), pages 367-389, September.
    4. Martin Ardanaz & Carlos Scartascini, 2013. "The Economic Effects of Constitutions: Do Budget Institutions Make Forms of Government More Alike?," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-427, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Richard McManus & F Gulcin Ozkan, 2017. "Who does better for the economy? Presidents versus parliamentary democracies," Discussion Papers 17/03, Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Mariano Tommasi & María Franco Chuaire & Carlos Scartascini, 2014. "State Capacity and the Quality of Policies. Revisiting the Relationship between Openness and Government Size," Working Papers 115, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Nov 2014.
    7. Bettareli, Luca & Cella, Michela & Iannantuoni, Giovanna & Manzoni, Elena, 2017. "It's a matter of confidence: Institutions, government stability and economic outcomes," MPRA Paper 77546, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Mariano Tommasi & Germán Caruso & Carlos Scartascini, 2014. "Are We Playing the Same Game? The Economic Effects of Constitutions Depend on the Degree of Institutionalization," Working Papers 116, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Dec 2014.

  5. James Rockey, 2009. "Who is left-wing, and who just thinks they are?," Discussion Papers in Economics 09/23, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberton Montagnoli & Mirko Moro & Georgios A Panos & Robert E Wright, 2016. "Financial literacy and political orientation in Great Britain," Working Papers 1614, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    2. McKenzie, David J. & Özler, Berk, 2011. "The Impact of Economics Blogs," CEPR Discussion Papers 8558, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. David McKenzie & Berk Özler, 2014. "Quantifying Some of the Impacts of Economics Blogs," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(3), pages 567-597.

  6. James C. Rockey, 2007. "Which Democracies Pay Higher Wages?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 07/600, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Rockey, James, 2012. "Reconsidering the fiscal effects of constitutions," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 313-323.

  7. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2007. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 07/599, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, "undated". "Voting and the macroeconomy: separating trend from cycle," Discussion Papers 11/14, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Bjørnskov, Christian & Rode, Martin, 2016. "And Yet It Grows: Crisis, Ideology, and Interventionist Policy Ratchets," Working Paper Series 1135, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Pierpaolo Parrotta & Dario Pozzoli & Davide Sala, 2016. "Ethnic Diversity and Firms' Export Behavior," Post-Print hal-01512787, HAL.
    4. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Florian Chatagny, 2015. "Incentive Effects of Fiscal Rules on the Finance Minister's Behaviour: Evidence from Revenue Projections in Swiss Cantons," CESifo Working Paper Series 5223, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Partisan Politics: The Empirical Evidence from OECD Panel Studies," CESifo Working Paper Series 6024, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2016. "Labour Costs and the Size of Government," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01350614, HAL.
    8. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    9. Belke, Ansgar & Potrafke, Niklas, 2009. "Does Government Ideology Matter in Monetary Policy? – A Panel Data Analysis for OECD Countries," Ruhr Economic Papers 94, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    10. Toke S Aidt & Vitor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2016. "Shades of red and blue: Political ideology and sustainable development," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1635, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Toke S. Aidt & Vitor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2018. "Shades of red and blue: government ideology and sustainable development," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 175(3), pages 303-323, June.
    12. Herwartz, Helmut & Theilen, Bernd, 2017. "Ideology and redistribution through public spending," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 74-90.
    13. Benjamin Michallet & Giuseppe Gaeta & François Facchini, 2015. "Greening up or not? The determinants of political parties' environmental concern: an empirical analysis based on European data (1970-2008)," Working Papers halshs-01154006, HAL.
    14. Weijie Luo & Andrew Pickering & Paulo Santos Monteiro, 2017. "Inequality and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 17/02, Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "Globalization and Social Justice in OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 5210, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Andrew C. Pickering & James Rockey, 2012. "Ideology and the growth of US state government," Working Papers 2012/6, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    17. Andrew Pickering & Sheraz Rajput, 2015. "Inequality and the composition of taxes," Discussion Papers 15/04, Department of Economics, University of York.
    18. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke & Simone Winterer, 2015. "Das Wachstum der Verteidigungsausgaben in Deutschland (1951–2011): Welchen Einfluss haben die Parteien?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 68(10), pages 19-26, May.
    19. Benjamin Michallet & Giuseppe Gaeta & François Facchini, 2015. "Greening up or not? The determinants of political parties' environmental concern: an empirical analysis based on European data (1970-2008)," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01154006, HAL.
    20. Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2014. "Polarization and Government Debt," Discussion Papers 14/10, Department of Economics, University of York.
    21. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "The Labor Share and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, University of York.
    22. Benoît LE MAUX & Kristýna DOSTÁLOVÁ & Fabio PADOVANO, 2017. "Ideology and Public Policies: A Quasi-Experimental Test of the Hypothesis that Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-01-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.
    23. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.
    24. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2013. "Political Ideology and Economic Growth: Evidence from the French Democracy," Post-Print halshs-00917617, HAL.
    25. Benoît Le Maux & Kristýna Dostálová & Fabio Padovano, 2017. "Ideology or Voters? A Quasi-Experimental Test of Why Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-05-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.

Articles

  1. Rockey, James & Temple, Jonathan, 2016. "Growth econometrics for agnostics and true believers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 86-102.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    2. Bjørnskov, Christian & Rode, Martin, 2016. "And Yet It Grows: Crisis, Ideology, and Interventionist Policy Ratchets," Working Paper Series 1135, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    5. Toke S. Aidt & Vitor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2018. "Shades of red and blue: government ideology and sustainable development," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 175(3), pages 303-323, June.
    6. Niklas Potrafke, 2017. "Government Ideology and Economic Policy-Making in the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 6444, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Benoît LE MAUX & Kristýna DOSTÁLOVÁ & Fabio PADOVANO, 2017. "Ideology and Public Policies: A Quasi-Experimental Test of the Hypothesis that Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-01-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.
    8. Niklas Potrafke & Margret Schneider & Christian Simon, 2013. "Zum Einfluss von Parteiideologie auf die Staatstätigkeit in den US-Bundesstaaten," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(11), pages 24-29, June.
    9. Robert A. Greer & Dwight V. Denison, 2016. "Determinants of Debt Concentration at the State Level," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(4), pages 111-130, December.
    10. Benoît Le Maux & Kristýna Dostálová & Fabio Padovano, 2017. "Ideology or Voters? A Quasi-Experimental Test of Why Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-05-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.

  3. Rockey, James, 2012. "Reconsidering the fiscal effects of constitutions," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 313-323.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2011. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 907-919, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 18 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (8) 2007-11-10 2008-01-12 2010-05-29 2010-06-18 2011-01-30 2012-04-23 2015-08-01 2015-08-07. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (6) 2007-11-10 2008-01-12 2010-05-29 2010-06-18 2015-08-01 2015-08-07. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2008-01-12 2011-01-30 2017-03-12 2017-12-11
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2015-08-01 2015-08-07
  5. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (2) 2015-05-09 2015-10-17
  6. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (2) 2015-08-01 2015-08-07
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2007-11-10 2012-04-23
  8. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2016-04-30
  9. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2015-05-09
  10. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2017-07-23
  11. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2017-12-11
  12. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2017-07-23
  13. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2017-07-23
  14. NEP-MST: Market Microstructure (1) 2016-04-23
  15. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (1) 2016-04-23
  16. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2010-05-29
  17. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2015-08-07

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