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Carlo Prato

Personal Details

First Name:Carlo
Middle Name:
Last Name:Prato
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppr228
http://carloprato.com

Affiliation

Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP)
Columbia University

New York City, New York (United States)
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/iserp/

212-854-3081
212-854-8925
420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027
RePEc:edi:iscolus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2017. "Wisdom of the Crowd? Information Aggregation and Electoral Incentives," MPRA Paper 82753, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2014. "Electoral Imbalances and their Consequences," MPRA Paper 68650, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 26 Nov 2015.
  3. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2014. "The Voters' Curses: The Upsides and Downsides of Political Engagement," MPRA Paper 53482, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2013. "Rational Ignorance, Elections, and Reform," MPRA Paper 68638, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Dec 2015.
  5. Carlo Prato & Bruno Strulovici, 2010. "Direct Democracy, Political Delegation, and Responsibility Substitution," Discussion Papers 1515, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.

Articles

  1. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2017. "Citizens United: A Theoretical Evaluation," Political Science Research and Methods, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 567-574, July.
  2. Carlo Prato & Bruno Strulovici, 2017. "The hidden cost of direct democracy: How ballot initiatives affect politicians’ selection and incentives," Journal of Theoretical Politics, , vol. 29(3), pages 440-466, July.
  3. Daniel Diermeier & Carlo Prato & Razvan Vlaicu, 2016. "A bargaining model of endogenous procedures," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 47(4), pages 985-1012, December.
  4. Buisseret, Peter & Prato, Carlo, 2016. "Electoral control and the human capital of politicians," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 34-55.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2014. "Electoral Imbalances and their Consequences," MPRA Paper 68650, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 26 Nov 2015.

    Cited by:

    1. Denter, Philipp, 2020. "Campaign contests," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    2. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2017. "Rational ignorance, populism, and reform," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86371, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Stephane Wolton, 2019. "Are Biased Media Bad for Democracy?," American Journal of Political Science, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 63(3), pages 548-562, July.
    4. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2013. "Rational Ignorance, Elections, and Reform," MPRA Paper 68638, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Dec 2015.
    5. Avidit Acharya & Edoardo Grillo & Takuo Sugaya & Eray Turkel, 2019. "Dynamic Campaign Spending," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 601, Collegio Carlo Alberto.

  2. Prato, Carlo & Wolton, Stephane, 2013. "Rational Ignorance, Elections, and Reform," MPRA Paper 68638, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Dec 2015.

    Cited by:

    1. Giray Gozgor, 2020. "The Role of Economic Uncertainty in Rising Populism in the EU," CESifo Working Paper Series 8499, CESifo.
    2. Marina Agranov & Ran Eilat & Konstantin Sonin, 2020. "A Political Model of Trust," Working Papers 2020-50, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    3. Morelli, Massimo & Sasso, Greg, 2020. "Bureaucrats under Populism," CEPR Discussion Papers 14499, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Brad R. Taylor, 2020. "The psychological foundations of rational ignorance: biased heuristics and decision costs," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 70-88, March.
    5. Emilio Ocampo, 2019. "The Economic Analysis of Populism. A Selective Review of the Literature," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 694, Universidad del CEMA.
    6. Fabrizio Botti & Marcella Corsi, 2019. "La destra populista in Europa: una prospettiva economica (The populist right in Europe: An economic perspective)," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 72(286), pages 133-147.

  3. Carlo Prato & Bruno Strulovici, 2010. "Direct Democracy, Political Delegation, and Responsibility Substitution," Discussion Papers 1515, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.

    Cited by:

    1. Le Bihan, Patrick, 2015. "Popular Referendum and Electoral Accountability," IAST Working Papers 15-31, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).
    2. Tim Willems, 2013. "Political Accountability and Policy Experimentation: Why to Elect Left-Handed Politicians?," Economics Series Working Papers 647, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Daniel Diermeier & Carlo Prato & Razvan Vlaicu, 2016. "A bargaining model of endogenous procedures," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 47(4), pages 985-1012, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Zapal, Jan, 2020. "Simple Markovian equilibria in dynamic spatial legislative bargaining," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    2. Marina Azzimonti & Laura Karpuska & Gabriel Mihalache, 2020. "Bargaining over Mandatory Spending and Entitlements," Department of Economics Working Papers 20-02, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
    3. Hülya Eraslan & Kirill Evdokimov & Jan Zápal, 2020. "Dynamic Legislative Bargaining," ISER Discussion Paper 1090, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    4. Kim, Duk Gyoo, 2019. "Recognition without replacement in legislative bargaining," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 161-175.
    5. Thomas Choate & John A Weymark & Alan E. Wiseman, 2018. "Legislative Bargaining and Partisan Delegation," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 18-00010, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.

  2. Buisseret, Peter & Prato, Carlo, 2016. "Electoral control and the human capital of politicians," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 34-55.

    Cited by:

    1. Julio Alberto Ramos-Pastrana, 2017. "Who's Getting the Office? Autocracy And Elected Politicians' Career Path: Evidence from the Mexican States," CAEPR Working Papers 2017-008, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington.
    2. Mizuno, Nobuhiro & Okazawa, Ryosuke, 2018. "Why do voters elect less qualified candidates?," MPRA Paper 89215, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Fehrler, Sebastian & Fischbacher, Urs & Schneider, Maik, 2017. "Who Runs? Honesty and Self-Selection into Politics," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168083, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Prasenjit Banerjee & Vegard Iversen & Sandip Mitra & Antonio Nicolò & Kunal Sen, 2018. "Politicians and their promises in an uncertain world: Evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment in India," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1806, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    5. Pique, Ricardo, 2019. "Higher pay, worse outcomes? The impact of mayoral wages on local government quality in Peru," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 1-20.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (5) 2011-01-30 2014-02-15 2016-01-18 2016-01-18 2018-02-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (5) 2011-01-30 2014-02-15 2016-01-18 2016-01-18 2018-02-05. Author is listed
  3. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (2) 2011-01-30 2018-02-05
  4. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2014-02-15
  5. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2014-02-15

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