IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/ppa316.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Miles Ian Parker

Personal Details

First Name:Miles
Middle Name:Ian
Last Name:Parker
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppa316
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @milesiparker
Terminal Degree:2016 School of Economics and Finance; Wellington School of Business and Government; Victoria University of Wellington (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) European Central Bank

Frankfurt am Main, Germany
http://www.ecb.europa.eu/
RePEc:edi:emieude (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) School of Economics and Finance
Wellington School of Business and Government
Victoria University of Wellington

Wellington, New Zealand
https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/business/academic-areas/economics-and-finance
RePEc:edi:egvuwnz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jed Armstrong & Miles Parker, 2016. "How wages are set: evidence from a large survey of firms," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  2. Miles Parker, 2016. "How exporters set prices: evidence from a large behavioural survey," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  3. Miles Parker, 2016. "Global inflation: the role of food, housing and energy prices," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  4. Miles Parker, 2016. "The impact of disasters on inflation," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  5. Miles Parker, 2014. "Price-setting behaviour in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2014/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  6. Miles Parker & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Exchange rate and commodity price pass‐through in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  7. Miles Parker, 2014. "How much of what New Zealanders consume is imported? Estimates from input-output tables," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  8. Greenslade, Jennifer & Parker, Miles, 2010. "New insights into price-setting behaviour in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 395, Bank of England.
  9. Macallan, Clare & Millard, Stephen & Parker, Miles, 2008. "The cyclicality of mark-ups and profit margins for the United Kingdom: some new evidence," Bank of England working papers 351, Bank of England.
  10. Miles Parker, 2006. "Diverging Trends in Aggregate and Firm-Level Volatility in the UK," Discussion Papers 16, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.

Articles

  1. Parker, Miles, 2018. "How global is “global inflation”?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 174-197.
  2. Miles Parker, 2018. "The Impact of Disasters on Inflation," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 21-48, April.
  3. Miles Parker, 2017. "Price-setting behaviour in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 217-236, September.
  4. Amy Wood & Ilan Noy & Miles Parker, 2016. "The Canterbury rebuild five years on from the Christchurch earthquake," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-16, February.
  5. Miles Parker, 2014. "Exchange rate movements and consumer prices: some perspectives," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 31-41, March.
  6. Jennifer V. Greenslade & Miles Parker, 2012. "New Insights into Price‐Setting Behaviour in the UK: Introduction and Survey Results," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 1-15, February.
  7. Miles Parker & Daan Steenkamp, 2012. "The economic impact of the Canterbury earthquakes," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 75, pages 13-25, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Greenslade, Jennifer & Parker, Miles, 2010. "New insights into price-setting behaviour in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 395, Bank of England.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The macroeconomic challenge
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2014-02-19 20:07:50

Working papers

  1. Jed Armstrong & Miles Parker, 2016. "How wages are set: evidence from a large survey of firms," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Michelle Lewis & Dr John McDermott & Adam Richardson, 2016. "Inflation expectations and the conduct of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-12, March.

  2. Miles Parker, 2016. "Global inflation: the role of food, housing and energy prices," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Parker, Miles, 2016. "The impact of disasters on inflation," Working Paper Series 1982, European Central Bank.
    2. William Ginn & Marc Pourroy, 2021. "The Contribution of Food Subsidy Policy to Monetary Policy," Working Papers hal-02944209, HAL.
    3. Jongrim Ha & M. Ayhan Kose & Franziska L. Ohnsorge, 2019. "Global Inflation Synchronization," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1903, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    4. Diana Alwis, 2020. "Distributional Impacts of Disaster Recovery: Sri Lankan Households a Decade after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 195-222, April.
    5. Godwin Edet Bassey & Uduak Michael Ekong, 2019. "Energy Consumption and Inflation Dynamics in Nigeria: An ARDL Cointegration Approach," Energy Economics Letters, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(2), pages 66-83, December.
    6. Kiselev, Aleksei & Zhivaykina, Aleksandra, 2020. "The role of global relative price changes in international comovement of inflation," The Journal of Economic Asymmetries, Elsevier, vol. 22(C).
    7. Patrick Blagrave, 2019. "Inflation Co-Movement in Emerging and Developing Asia: The Monsoon Effect," IMF Working Papers 2019/147, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Oleg S. Sukharev, 2020. "Inflation control and adequacy of targeting to economic growth policy," Upravlenets, Ural State University of Economics, vol. 11(1), pages 33-44, March.
    9. Cepni, Oguzhan & Clements, Michael P., 2021. "How Local is the Local Inflation Factor? Evidence from Emerging European Countries," Working Papers 8-2021, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics.
    10. Aleksei Kiselev & Aleksandra Zhivaykina, 2019. "The role of global relative price changes in international comovement of inflation," Bank of Russia Working Paper Series wps53, Bank of Russia.
    11. De Soyres,Francois Michel Marie Raphael & Franco Bedoya,Sebastian, 2019. "Inflation Dynamics and Global Value Chains," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9090, The World Bank.
    12. Aytül Ganioğlu, 2020. "How Consumers’ Inflation Expectations Respond to Explosive Periods of Food and Energy Prices: Evidence for European Union Countries," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2020(3), pages 351-377.
    13. Luis F. Espinoza-Audelo & Ernesto León-Castro & Marycruz Olazabal-Lugo & José M. Merigó & Anna M. Gil-Lafuente, 2020. "Using Ordered Weighted Average for Weighted Averages Inflation," International Journal of Information Technology & Decision Making (IJITDM), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 19(02), pages 601-628, April.
    14. Martin Feldkircher & Pierre L. Siklos, 2018. "Global inflation dynamics and inflation expectations," CAMA Working Papers 2018-60, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    15. Gregor Bäurle & Matthias Gubler & Diego R. Känzig, 2017. "International inflation spillovers - the role of different shocks," Working Papers 2017-07, Swiss National Bank.
    16. Szafranek, Karol, 2021. "Evidence on time-varying inflation synchronization," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 1-13.
    17. Karolina Tura-Gawron & Maria Siranova & Karol Fisikowski, 2018. "ARE CONSUMER INFLATION EXPECTATIONS AN INTERNATIONAL PHENOMENON? Results of spatial panel regressions models," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 50, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    18. Philipp Baumann & Enzo Rossi & Alexander Volkmann, 2020. "What Drives Inflation and How: Evidence from Additive Mixed Models Selected by cAIC," Papers 2006.06274, arXiv.org.

  3. Miles Parker, 2016. "The impact of disasters on inflation," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Stéphane Blancard & Maximin Bonnet & Jean-François Hoarau, 2020. "The specific role of agriculture for economic vulnerability of small island spaces," Working Papers hal-02441237, HAL.
    2. Alessandro Cantelmo, 2020. "Rare disasters, the natural interest rate and monetary policy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1309, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Klomp, Jeroen, 2017. "Flooded with debt," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(PA), pages 93-103.
    4. Hu, Xi & Pant, Raghav & Hall, Jim W. & Surminski, Swenja & Huang, Jiashun, 2019. "Multi-scale assessment of the economic impacts of flooding: evidence from firm to macro-level analysis in the Chinese manufacturing sector," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100534, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Jeroen Klomp & John Sseruyange, 2021. "Earthquakes and Economic Outcomes: Does Central Bank Independence Matter?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 335-359, April.
    6. Simon Dikau & Nick Robins & Matthias Täger, 2019. "Building a sustainable financial system: the state of practice and future priorities," Revista de Estabilidad Financiera, Banco de España, issue Autumn.
    7. Yizao Liu & Adam N. Rabinowitz, 2021. "The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on retail dairy prices," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 37(1), pages 108-121, January.
    8. Xi Hu & Raghav Pant & Jim W. Hall & Swenja Surminski & Jiashun Huang, 2019. "Multi-Scale Assessment of the Economic Impacts of Flooding: Evidence from Firm to Macro-Level Analysis in the Chinese Manufacturing Sector," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(7), pages 1-18, April.
    9. Oscar Zapata, 2018. "Turning to God in Tough Times? Human Versus Material Losses from Climate Disasters in Canada," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 259-281, October.
    10. Klomp, Jeroen, 2020. "Do natural disasters affect monetary policy? A quasi-experiment of earthquakes," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    11. Liebich, Lena & Nöh, Lukas & Rutkowski, Felix & Schwarz, Milena, 2020. "Current developments in green finance," Working Papers 05/2020, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung.

  4. Miles Parker, 2014. "Price-setting behaviour in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2014/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Funke, Michael & Kirkby, Robert & Mihaylovski, Petar, 2018. "House prices and macroprudential policy in an estimated DSGE model of New Zealand," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 152-171.
    2. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V Guender, 2016. "The Real Exchange Rate in Open-Economy Taylor Rules: A Re-Assessment," Working Papers in Economics 16/10, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    3. Philip Bunn & Colin Ellis, 2012. "How do Individual UK Producer Prices Behave?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 16-34, February.
    4. Fernando Alvarez & Francesco Lippi & Luigi Paciello, 2013. "Monetary Shocks with Observation and menu Costs," EIEF Working Papers Series 1310, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised May 2013.
    5. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V Guender, 2016. "What to Aim for? The Choice of an Inflation Objective When Openness Matters," Working Papers in Economics 16/09, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    6. Daphne Nicolitsas, 2016. "Price Setting Practices In Greece: Evidence From A Small-Scale Firm-Level Survey," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(4), pages 367-382, October.
    7. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V. Guender, 2019. "A Re-Evaluation of the Choice of an Inflation Target in the Wake of the Global Financial Crisis," Working Papers in Economics 19/17, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    8. Hashmat Khan & John Tsoukalas, 2011. "Effects of Productivity Shocks on Employment: UK Evidence (revised 25 February 2013)," Carleton Economic Papers 11-05, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 25 Feb 2013.
    9. Macallan, Clare & Taylor, Tim & O'Grady, Tom, 2011. "Assessing the risk to inflation from inflation expectations," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(2), pages 100-110.
    10. Khan Hashmat & Tsoukalas John, 2013. "Effects of productivity shocks on hours worked: UK evidence," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-31, September.
    11. F. Alvarez & F. Lippi & L. Paciello, 2010. "Optimal price setting with observation and menu costs," 2010 Meeting Papers 478, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Froyen, Richard T. & Guender, Alfred V., 2014. "Price level targeting and the delegation issue in an open economy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 12-15.
    13. Miles Parker, 2016. "How exporters set prices: evidence from a large behavioural survey," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    14. Michelle Lewis & Dr John McDermott & Adam Richardson, 2016. "Inflation expectations and the conduct of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-12, March.
    15. Jed Armstrong & Miles Parker, 2016. "How wages are set: evidence from a large survey of firms," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    16. Anna Watson, 2010. "The Impact of Trade Integration and Competition on Real and Nominal Price Rigidities: Insights from a New-Keynesian DSGE Model," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_061, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    17. N. A. Karlova & I. V. Bogacheva & E. V. Puzanova., 2018. "Drivers of price inertia: Survey evidence," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 8.
    18. Russell Pittman, 2009. "Who Are You Calling Irrational? Marginal Costs, Variable Costs, and the Pricing Practices of Firms," EAG Discussions Papers 200903, Department of Justice, Antitrust Division.
    19. Thorvardur Tjörvi Ólafsson & Ásgerdur Pétursdóttir & Karen Á. Vignisdóttir, 2011. "Price setting in turbulent times," Economics wp54, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
    20. Ellis, Colin, 2009. "Do supermarket prices change from week to week?," Bank of England working papers 378, Bank of England.
    21. Fernando Alvarez & Francesco Lippi & Luigi Paciello, 2015. "Phillips curves with observation and menu costs," EIEF Working Papers Series 1508, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Jul 2015.
    22. Froyen, Richard T. & Guender, Alfred V., 2018. "The real exchange rate in Taylor rules: A Re-Assessment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 140-151.

  5. Miles Parker & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Exchange rate and commodity price pass‐through in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Günes Kamber & Gabriela Nodari & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "The Impact of Commodity Price Movements on the New Zealand Economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    2. Daan Steenkamp, 2014. "How volatile are New Zealand’s terms of trade? An international comparison," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 3-14, June.
    3. Kristin Forbes & Ida Hjortsoe & Tsvetelina Nenova, 2020. "International Evidence on Shock-Dependent Exchange Rate Pass-Through," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 68(4), pages 721-763, December.
    4. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.
    5. Vo, Duc, 2019. "Macroeconomics Determinants of Exchange Rate Pass-through: New Evidence from the Asia-Pacific Region," MPRA Paper 103293, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Miles Parker, 2014. "Exchange rate movements and consumer prices: some perspectives," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 31-41, March.

  6. Greenslade, Jennifer & Parker, Miles, 2010. "New insights into price-setting behaviour in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 395, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V Guender, 2016. "The Real Exchange Rate in Open-Economy Taylor Rules: A Re-Assessment," Working Papers in Economics 16/10, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    2. Philip Bunn & Colin Ellis, 2012. "How do Individual UK Producer Prices Behave?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 16-34, February.
    3. Andreja Pufnik & Davor Kunovac, 2013. "Pricing behaviour of Croatian Companies: results of a Firm survey and a Comparison with the eurozone," Working Papers 36, The Croatian National Bank, Croatia.
    4. Mamello Nchake, Lawrence Edwards and Asha Sundaram, 2015. "Price-setting Behavior and Competition in Developing Countries: An Analysis of Retail Outlets in Lesotho," Working Papers 567, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    5. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V Guender, 2016. "What to Aim for? The Choice of an Inflation Objective When Openness Matters," Working Papers in Economics 16/09, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    6. Numan-Parsons, Elisabeth & Stroombergen, Adolf Stroombergen & Fletcher, Ngaio, 2011. "Business Responses to the Introduction of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme: Part I," Occasional Papers 11/4, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    7. Arnildo Correa & Myrian Petrassi & Rafael Santos, 2018. "Price-Setting Behavior in Brazil: Survey Evidence," Journal of Business Cycle Research, Springer;Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys (CIRET), vol. 14(2), pages 283-310, November.
    8. Jennifer V. Greenslade & Miles Parker, 2012. "New Insights into Price‐Setting Behaviour in the UK: Introduction and Survey Results," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 1-15, February.
    9. Carmem Aparecida Feijo & Luiz Fernando Cerqueira, 2013. "Econometric Evidence on the Determinants of the Mark Up of Industrial Brazilian Firms in the 1990s," Economia, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics], vol. 14(1a), pages .91-119.
    10. Miles Parker, 2014. "Price-setting behaviour in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2014/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    11. Richard T. Froyen & Alfred V Guender, 2015. "Real-Exchange-Rate-Adjusted Inflation Targeting in an Open Economy: Some Analytical Results," Working Papers in Economics 15/14, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    12. Froyen, Richard T. & Guender, Alfred V., 2014. "Price level targeting and the delegation issue in an open economy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 12-15.
    13. Miles Parker, 2016. "How exporters set prices: evidence from a large behavioural survey," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    14. Arnildo da Silva Correa & Myrian Beatriz S. Petrassi & Rafael Santos, 2016. "Price-Setting Behavior in Brazil: survey evidence," Working Papers Series 422, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    15. Millard, Stephen, 2011. "An estimated DSGE model of energy, costs and inflation in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 432, Bank of England.
    16. Millard, Stephen & O'Grady, Tom, 2012. "What do sticky and flexible prices tell us?," Bank of England working papers 457, Bank of England.

  7. Macallan, Clare & Millard, Stephen & Parker, Miles, 2008. "The cyclicality of mark-ups and profit margins for the United Kingdom: some new evidence," Bank of England working papers 351, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. David Norman & Anthony Richards, 2012. "The Forecasting Performance of Single Equation Models of Inflation," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(280), pages 64-78, March.
    2. Mustafa Utku Özmen, 2020. "In Pursuit Of Understanding Markups In Restaurant Services Prices," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 65(06), pages 1423-1437, December.
    3. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "Creating Competitive Advantage: Policy Lessons from History," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 91, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    4. Crafts, Nicholas, 2012. "British relative economic decline revisited: The role of competition," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 17-29.
    5. Greenslade, Jennifer & Parker, Miles, 2010. "New insights into price-setting behaviour in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 395, Bank of England.
    6. Koski, Heli & Pajarinen, Mika, 2013. "Empirical Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Competition Policy," ETLA Working Papers 15, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    7. Antonella Stirati, 2016. "Real wages in the business cycle and the theory of income distribution: an unresolved conflict between theory and facts in mainstream macroeconomics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 639-661.
    8. Kapetanios, George & Millard, Stephen & Petrova, Katerina & Price, Simon, 2019. "Time-varying cointegration and the UK great ratios," Bank of England working papers 789, Bank of England.
    9. Jennifer V. Greenslade & Miles Parker, 2012. "New Insights into Price‐Setting Behaviour in the UK: Introduction and Survey Results," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 1-15, February.
    10. Tevdovski, Dragan & Madjoska, Joana & Jolakoski, Petar & Jovanovic, Branimir & Stojkoski, Viktor, 2020. "Firm profits and government activity: An empirical investigation," MPRA Paper 102762, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Crafts, Nicholas, 2011. "British Relative Economic Decline Revisited," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 42, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    12. Millard, Stephen & Rubio, Margarita & Varadi, Alexandra, 2021. "The macroprudential toolkit: effectiveness and interactions," Bank of England working papers 902, Bank of England.
    13. Nir Klein, 2011. "South Africa: The Cyclical Behavior of the Markups and its Implications for Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 2011/204, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Laurent Maurin & Moreno Roma & Igor Vetlov, 2011. "Profit Dynamics across the Largest Euro Area countries and Sectors," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 12, Bank of Lithuania.
    15. Salman Ahmad & Attiya Yasmin Javid, 2015. "Analysing the Price Cost Markup and Its Behaviour over the Business Cycles in Case of Manufacturing Industries of Pakistan," PIDE-Working Papers 2015:117, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    16. Günes Kamber & Stephen Millard, 2012. "Using Estimated Models to Assess Nominal and Real Rigidities in the United Kingdom," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(4), pages 97-119, December.
    17. Stirati, Antonella, 2014. "Real wages in the business cycle: an unresolved conflict between theory and facts in mainstream macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 53743, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. David Norman & Anthony Richards, 2010. "Modelling Inflation in Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2010-03, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    19. David Blanchflower, 2009. "Where Next For The Uk Economy?1," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 56(1), pages 1-23, February.
    20. Stephen Millard, & Margarita Rubio & Alexandra Varadi, 2020. "The impact of Covid-19 on productivity," Discussion Papers 2020/14, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).

  8. Miles Parker, 2006. "Diverging Trends in Aggregate and Firm-Level Volatility in the UK," Discussion Papers 16, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Diego Comin & Sunil Mulani, 2005. "A Theory of Growth and Volatility at the Aggregate and Firm Level," NBER Working Papers 11503, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Pengfei Wang & Yi Wen & Zhiwei Xu, 2013. "Financial development and long-run volatility trends," Working Papers 2013-003, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. Buch, Claudia M. & Döpke, Jörg & Stahn, Kerstin, 2008. "Great moderation at the firm level? Unconditional versus conditional output volatility," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2008,13, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    4. Pengfei Wang & Yi Wen & Zhiwei Xu, 2017. "Online Appendix to ""Financial Development and Long-Run Volatility Trends"," Online Appendices 15-174, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    5. Buch Claudia M & Doepke Joerg & Stahn Kerstin, 2009. "Great Moderation at the Firm Level? Unconditional vs. Conditional Output Volatility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-27, May.
    6. Hyunbae Chun & Jung-Wook Kim & Randall Morck, 2011. "Varying Heterogeneity among U.S. Firms: Facts and Implications," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 1034-1052, August.

Articles

  1. Parker, Miles, 2018. "How global is “global inflation”?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 174-197. See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Miles Parker, 2018. "The Impact of Disasters on Inflation," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 21-48, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Miles Parker, 2017. "Price-setting behaviour in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 217-236, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Amy Wood & Ilan Noy & Miles Parker, 2016. "The Canterbury rebuild five years on from the Christchurch earthquake," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-16, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Rebecca Williams, 2017. "Business cycle review: 2008 to present day," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-22, March.
    2. Hanna Habibi & Jan Feld, 2020. "The effects of earthquake exposure on preparedness in the short and long term: a difference-in-differences estimation," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 104(2), pages 1443-1463, November.
    3. Parker, Miles, 2016. "The impact of disasters on inflation," Working Paper Series 1982, European Central Bank.
    4. Sin Meun How & Geoffrey N. Kerr, 2019. "Earthquake Impacts on Immigrant Participation in the Greater Christchurch Construction Labor Market," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(2), pages 241-269, April.
    5. Sally Owen & Ilan Noy & Jacob Pástor-Paz & David Fleming, 2019. "EQC and extreme weather events (part 2): Measuring the impact of insurance on New Zealand landslip, storm and flood recovery using nightlights," Working Papers 19_19, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    6. Sovacool, Benjamin K. & Tan-Mullins, May & Abrahamse, Wokje, 2018. "Bloated bodies and broken bricks: Power, ecology, and inequality in the political economy of natural disaster recovery," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 243-255.
    7. Wang, Kun & Tsui, Wai Hong Kan & Li, Lan-Bing & Lei, Zheng & Fu, Xiaowen, 2020. "Entry pattern of low-cost carriers in New Zealand - The impact of domestic and trans-Tasman market factors," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 36-45.
    8. Porntida Poontirakul & Charlotte Brown & Erica Seville & John Vargo & Ilan Noy, 2017. "Insurance as a Double-Edged Sword: Quantitative Evidence from the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 42(4), pages 609-632, October.
    9. Poontirakul, Porntida & Brown, Charlotte & Noy, Ilan & Seville, Erica & Vargo, John, 2016. "The role of commercial insurance in post-disaster recovery: Quantitative evidence from the 2011 Christchurch earthquake," Working Paper Series 4980, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    10. Filippova, Olga & Noy, Ilan, 2018. "Preventing buildings from falling down: Challenges for earthquake-strengthening policy in small-town New Zealand," Working Paper Series 6961, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    11. Selene Perazzini, 2020. "Public-Private Partnership in the Management of Natural Disasters: A Review," Papers 2006.05845, arXiv.org.
    12. Tsui, Kan Wai Hong & Tan, David & Chow, Clement Kong Wing & Shi, Song, 2019. "Regional airline capacity, tourism demand and housing prices: A case study of New Zealand," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 8-22.
    13. Thoa Hoang & Ilan Noy, 2019. "Wellbeing After a Managed Retreat: Observations from a Large New Zealand Program," CESifo Working Paper Series 7938, CESifo.
    14. Gujun Pu & Alice Chang-Richards & Suzanne Wilkinson & Regan Potangaroa, 2021. "What makes a successful livelihood recovery? a study of China’s Lushan earthquake," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 105(3), pages 2543-2567, February.

  5. Miles Parker, 2014. "Exchange rate movements and consumer prices: some perspectives," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 31-41, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Miles Parker, 2014. "How much of what New Zealanders consume is imported? Estimates from input-output tables," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    2. Miles Parker & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Exchange rate and commodity price pass‐through in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

  6. Jennifer V. Greenslade & Miles Parker, 2012. "New Insights into Price‐Setting Behaviour in the UK: Introduction and Survey Results," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 1-15, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Choudhary, M. Ali & Faheem, Abdul & Hanif, M. Nadim & Naeem, Saima & Pasha, Farooq, 2016. "Price setting & price stickiness: A developing economy perspective," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 44-61.
    2. Richard Senner & Didier Sornette, 2019. "The Holy Grail of Crypto Currencies: Ready to Replace Fiat Money?," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(4), pages 966-1000, October.
    3. Steffen Ahrens & Inske Pirschel & Dennis J. Snower, 2014. "A Theory of Price Adjustment under Loss Aversion," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2014-065, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    4. Daphne Nicolitsas, 2016. "Price Setting Practices In Greece: Evidence From A Small-Scale Firm-Level Survey," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(4), pages 367-382, October.
    5. The Anh Pham & Hoang Huy Nguyen & Hung Duc Nguyen, 2019. "Price adjustment lags and their asymmetries in Vietnam," International Journal of Economics and Business Research, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 17(3), pages 342-359.
    6. G. R. Chen, 2016. "Dynamic Model for Market Competition and Price Rigidity," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(36), pages 3485-3496, August.
    7. Weihua Zhou & Tiantian Lin & Gangshu (George) Cai, 2020. "Guarantor Financing in a Four‐Party Supply Chain Game with Leadership Influence," Production and Operations Management, Production and Operations Management Society, vol. 29(9), pages 2035-2056, September.
    8. Pitschner, Stefan, 2020. "How do firms set prices? Narrative evidence from corporate filings," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 124(C).
    9. Tovonony Razafindrabe, 2017. "Nonlinearity and asymmetry in the exchange rate pass-through: What role for nominal price stickiness?," Post-Print halshs-01683803, HAL.
    10. SungJu Song & Myung‐Soo Yie & Chang‐Gui Park, 2020. "Price‐Setting Behavior of Korean Firms†," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 97-120, March.
    11. S. Dupraz, 2017. "A Kinked-Demand Theory of Price Rigidity," Working papers 656, Banque de France.
    12. Miles Parker, 2014. "Price-setting behaviour in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2014/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    13. Froyen, Richard T. & Guender, Alfred V., 2014. "Price level targeting and the delegation issue in an open economy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 12-15.
    14. Günes Kamber & Stephen Millard, 2012. "Using Estimated Models to Assess Nominal and Real Rigidities in the United Kingdom," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(4), pages 97-119, December.
    15. Zakaria Babutsidze, 2012. "Asymmetric (S,s) pricing: implications for monetary policy," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/53r60a8s3ku, Sciences Po.
    16. Watson, Anna, 2016. "Trade openness and inflation: The role of real and nominal price rigidities," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 137-169.
    17. Giulietti, Monica & Otero, Jesús & Waterson, Michael, 2020. "Rigidities and adjustments of daily prices to costs: Evidence from supermarket data," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 116(C).
    18. Haberis, Alex & Masolo, Riccardo & Reinold, Kate, 2016. "Deflation probability and the scope for monetary loosening in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 627, Bank of England.
    19. Burgess, Stephen & Fernandez-Corugedo, Emilio & Groth, Charlotta & Harrison, Richard & Monti, Francesca & Theodoridis, Konstantinos & Waldron, Matt, 2013. "The Bank of England's forecasting platform: COMPASS, MAPS, EASE and the suite of models," Bank of England working papers 471, Bank of England.
    20. Saleheen, Jumana & Levina, Iren & Melolinna, Marko & Tatomir, Srdan, 2017. "The financial system and productive investment: new survey evidence," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 57(1), pages 4-17.

  7. Miles Parker & Daan Steenkamp, 2012. "The economic impact of the Canterbury earthquakes," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 75, pages 13-25, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Rebecca Craigie & David Gillmore & Nicolas Groshenny, 2012. "Matching workers with jobs:how well is the New Zealand labour market doing?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 75, pages 3-12, December.
    2. Mark C. Quigley & Luke G. Bennetts & Patricia Durance & Petra M. Kuhnert & Mark D. Lindsay & Keith G. Pembleton & Melanie E. Roberts & Christopher J. White, 2019. "The provision and utility of science and uncertainty to decision-makers: earth science case studies," Environment Systems and Decisions, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 307-348, September.
    3. Rebecca Williams, 2017. "Business cycle review: 2008 to present day," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-22, March.
    4. Parker, Miles, 2016. "The impact of disasters on inflation," Working Paper Series 1982, European Central Bank.
    5. Bachar Fakhry & Christian Richter, 2018. "Does the Federal Constitutional Court Ruling Mean the German Financial Market is Efficient?," European Journal of Business Science and Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics, vol. 4(2), pages 111-125, December.
    6. Dhritidyuti Bose & Renee Philip & Richard Sullivan, 2016. "Returning to Surplus: New Zealand's Post-GFC Fiscal Consolidation Experience," Treasury Working Paper Series 16/05, New Zealand Treasury.
    7. Maria Makabenta Ikeda & Arlene Garces-Ozanne, 2016. "Human Security, Social Competence and Natural Disasters in Japan and New Zealand: A Case study of Filipino migrants," Japan Social Innovation Journal, University of Hyogo Institute for Policy Analysis and Social Innovation, vol. 6(1), pages 1-42, March.
    8. Morrish, Sussie C. & Jones, Rosalind, 2020. "Post-disaster business recovery: An entrepreneurial marketing perspective," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 83-92.
    9. Sin Meun How & Geoffrey N. Kerr, 2019. "Earthquake Impacts on Immigrant Participation in the Greater Christchurch Construction Labor Market," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(2), pages 241-269, April.
    10. Vicki Marion Bier, 2017. "Understanding and Mitigating the Impacts of Massive Relocations Due to Disasters," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 179-202, July.
    11. Amy Wood & Ilan Noy & Miles Parker, 2016. "The Canterbury rebuild five years on from the Christchurch earthquake," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-16, February.
    12. Jeff Borland, 2014. "Recent Unemployment Experience in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/01, New Zealand Treasury.
    13. Doyle, Lisa & Noy, Ilan, 2013. "The short-run nationwide Macroeconomic effects of the Canterbury earthquakes," Working Paper Series 2677, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    14. Poontirakul, Porntida & Brown, Charlotte & Noy, Ilan & Seville, Erica & Vargo, John, 2016. "The role of commercial insurance in post-disaster recovery: Quantitative evidence from the 2011 Christchurch earthquake," Working Paper Series 4980, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    15. Levente Timar & Arthur Grimes & Richard Fabling, 2018. "Before a Fall: Impacts of Earthquake Regulation on Commercial Buildings," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 73-90, April.
    16. Cuffe, Harold E & Wills, Olivia, 2018. "Opportunity from disaster: Evidence of the Christchurch earthquake’s effects on high schoolers’ post-graduation outcomes," Working Paper Series 7891, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    17. Azmat Gani & Michael D. Clemes, 2017. "The main determinants effecting international visitor arrivals in New Zealand," Tourism Economics, , vol. 23(5), pages 921-940, August.
    18. Lopamudra Banerjee, 2021. "Natural hazard, employment uncertainty, and the choice of labor contracts," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 227-252, April.
    19. Palmer, Carolyn, 2014. "'Flood and fire and famine': Tax policy lessons from the Australian responses to natural disasters," Working Paper Series 3718, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Rankings

This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Number of Abstract Views in RePEc Services over the past 12 months, Weighted by Number of Authors

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (7) 2008-09-20 2014-04-11 2014-10-22 2016-03-10 2016-06-09 2016-12-04 2017-03-12. Author is listed
  2. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (5) 2008-09-20 2014-10-22 2016-03-06 2016-03-10 2016-11-20. Author is listed
  3. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (4) 2014-04-11 2016-05-14 2016-12-04 2017-03-12
  4. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (3) 2014-10-22 2014-11-07 2016-11-20
  5. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2010-07-31 2016-05-14
  6. NEP-EEC: European Economics (2) 2008-09-20 2010-07-31
  7. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2014-10-22
  8. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2016-03-10
  9. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2014-04-11
  10. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2016-03-06
  11. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2016-03-06
  12. NEP-MKT: Marketing (1) 2016-11-20
  13. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (1) 2014-04-11

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Miles Ian Parker should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.