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Alice Chen

Personal Details

First Name:Alice
Middle Name:
Last Name:Chen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1686
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/alicechenecon/

Affiliation

(99%) Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics
University of Southern California

Los Angeles, California (United States)
http://healthpolicy.usc.edu/
RePEc:edi:chuscus (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Sol Price School of Public Policy
University of Southern California

Los Angeles, California (United States)
https://priceschool.usc.edu/
RePEc:edi:spuscus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Alice Chen & Darius N. Lakdawalla, 2016. "Healing the Poor: The Influence of Patient Socioeconomic Status on Physician Supply Responses," NBER Working Papers 21930, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Alice Chen & Dana Goldman, 2015. "Health Care Spending: Historical Trends and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 21501, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Alice Chen & Emily Oster & Heidi Williams, 2014. "Why is Infant Mortality Higher in the US than in Europe?," NBER Working Papers 20525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Chen, Alice & Lakdawalla, Darius N., 2019. "Healing the poor: The influence of patient socioeconomic status on physician supply responses," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 43-54.
  2. Alice J. Chen & Amy J. Graves & Matthew J. Resnick & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Does Spending More Get More? Health Care Delivery and Fiscal Implications From a Medicare Fee Bump," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 37(4), pages 706-731, September.
  3. Alice Chen & Anthony T. Lo Sasso & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Supply‐side effects from public insurance expansions: Evidence from physician labor markets," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 690-708, April.
  4. Alice Chen & Anthony Lo Sasso & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Graduating into a downturn: Are physicians recession proof?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 223-235, January.
  5. Alice Chen & Dana Goldman, 2016. "Health Care Spending: Historical Trends and New Directions," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 291-319, October.
  6. Alice Chen & Emily Oster & Heidi Williams, 2016. "Why Is Infant Mortality Higher in the United States Than in Europe?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 89-124, May.
  7. Chen, Alice J., 2012. "When does weight matter most?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 285-295.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Alice Chen & Emily Oster & Heidi Williams, 2016. "Why Is Infant Mortality Higher in the United States Than in Europe?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 89-124, May.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Sam Watson’s journal round-up for 23rd May 2016
      by Sam Watson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2016-05-23 16:00:04

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Alice Chen & Emily Oster & Heidi Williams, 2016. "Why Is Infant Mortality Higher in the United States Than in Europe?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 89-124, May.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Why Is Infant Mortality Higher in the United States than in Europe? (American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 2016) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Alice Chen & Darius N. Lakdawalla, 2016. "Healing the Poor: The Influence of Patient Socioeconomic Status on Physician Supply Responses," NBER Working Papers 21930, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Jakub P. Hlávka & Jeffrey C. Yu & Dana P. Goldman & Darius N. Lakdawalla, 2021. "The economics of alternative payment models for pharmaceuticals," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 22(4), pages 559-569, June.
    2. Wu, Bingxiao, 2019. "Physician agency in China: Evidence from a drug-percentage incentive scheme," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 72-89.
    3. Xuefeng Li & Li Deng & Han Yang & Hui Wang, 2020. "Effect of socioeconomic status on the healthcare-seeking behavior of migrant workers in China," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(8), pages 1-15, August.

  2. Alice Chen & Dana Goldman, 2015. "Health Care Spending: Historical Trends and New Directions," NBER Working Papers 21501, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Joelle H Fong, 2019. "Out-of-pocket health spending among Medicare beneficiaries: Which chronic diseases are most costly?," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(9), pages 1-16, September.
    2. Eunhae Shin, 2019. "Hospital responses to price shocks under the prospective payment system," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 245-260, February.
    3. Maryaline Catillon & David Cutler & Thomas Getzen, 2018. "Two Hundred Years of Health and Medical Care: The Importance of Medical Care for Life Expectancy Gains," NBER Working Papers 25330, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Richard Z. Xie & Erica deFur Malik & Mark T. Linthicum & Jennifer L. Bright, 2021. "Putting Stakeholder Engagement at the Center of Health Economic Modeling for Health Technology Assessment in the United States," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 631-638, June.
    5. Mark Elder & Magnus Bengtsson & Lewis Akenji, 2016. "An Optimistic Analysis of the Means of Implementation for Sustainable Development Goals: Thinking about Goals as Means," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 8(9), pages 1-24, September.

  3. Alice Chen & Emily Oster & Heidi Williams, 2014. "Why is Infant Mortality Higher in the US than in Europe?," NBER Working Papers 20525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Dora L. Costa, 2015. "Health and the Economy in the United States from 1750 to the Present," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 503-570, September.
    2. Rossin-Slater, Maya & Wüst, Miriam, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool? Long-Term Impacts and Interactions with a Health Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 10254, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Butikofer, Aline & Loken, Katrine & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2018. "Infant Health Care and Long-Term," CEPR Discussion Papers 13064, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Butikofer, Aline & Løken, Katrine & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2016. "Infant Health Care and Long-Term Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 11652, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Lara Ibarra,Gabriel & Martinez Cruz,Adan L., 2015. "Exploring the sources of downward bias in measuring inequality of opportunity," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7458, The World Bank.
    6. Jonathan Colmer & Dajun Lin & Siying Liu & Jay Shimshack, 2020. "Why are pollution damages lower in developed countries? Insights from high income, high-particulate matter Hong Kong," CEP Discussion Papers dp1702, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Schwandt, Hannes, 2017. "The Lasting Legacy of Seasonal Influenza: In-Utero Exposure and Labor Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 10589, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Maya Rossin-Slater & Miriam Wüst, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool for Poor Children? Long-Term and Intergenerational Impacts and Interactions with an Infant Health Intervention," NBER Working Papers 22700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Mark E. McGovern, 2016. "Progress and the Lack of Progress in Addressing Infant Health and Infant Health Inequalities in Ireland during the 20th Century," Economics Working Papers 16-05, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast.

Articles

  1. Chen, Alice & Lakdawalla, Darius N., 2019. "Healing the poor: The influence of patient socioeconomic status on physician supply responses," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 43-54.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Alice J. Chen & Amy J. Graves & Matthew J. Resnick & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Does Spending More Get More? Health Care Delivery and Fiscal Implications From a Medicare Fee Bump," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 37(4), pages 706-731, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Alice J. Chen & Elizabeth L. Munnich & Stephen T. Parente & Michael R. Richards, 2022. "Do Physicians Warm Up to Higher Medicare Prices? Evidence from Alaska," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 41(2), pages 394-425, March.

  3. Alice Chen & Anthony T. Lo Sasso & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Supply‐side effects from public insurance expansions: Evidence from physician labor markets," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 690-708, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Chen Jiajia & van den Berghe Eunkyung & Kaestner Robert, 2019. "Is Primary Care A Substitute or Complement for Other Medical Care? Evidence from Medicaid," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 22(1), pages 1-36, June.
    2. Jeffrey Clemens & Joshua D. Gottlieb & Jeffrey Hicks, 2020. "How Would Medicare for All Affect Health System Capacity? Evidence from Medicare for Some," NBER Working Papers 28062, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Alice Chen & Anthony Lo Sasso & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Graduating into a downturn: Are physicians recession proof?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 223-235, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Huynh, Elisabeth & Swait, Joffre & Lancsar, Emily, 2022. "Modelling online job search and choices of dentists in the Australian job market: Staged sequential DCEs and FIML econometric methods," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C).
    2. Danyao Li & Michael R. Richards & Coady Wing, 2019. "Economic downturns and nurse attachment to federal employment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(6), pages 808-814, June.
    3. Marcus Dillender & Andrew I. Friedson & Cong T. Gian & Kosali I. Simon, 2021. "Is Healthcare Employment Resilient and “Recession Proof”?," NBER Working Papers 29287, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Alice Chen & Anthony T. Lo Sasso & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Supply‐side effects from public insurance expansions: Evidence from physician labor markets," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 690-708, April.

  5. Alice Chen & Dana Goldman, 2016. "Health Care Spending: Historical Trends and New Directions," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 291-319, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Alice Chen & Emily Oster & Heidi Williams, 2016. "Why Is Infant Mortality Higher in the United States Than in Europe?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 89-124, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Marco Alfano, 2020. "Islamic law and investments in children: evidence from the Sharia introduction in Nigeria," Working Papers 2003, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    2. Auer, Daniel & Kunz, Johannes S., 2021. "Communication Barriers and Infant Health: Intergenerational Effects of Randomly Allocating Refugees Across Language Regions," GLO Discussion Paper Series 867, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Eric French & John Bailey Jones & Elaine Kelly & Jeremy McCauley, 2018. "End-of-Life Medical Expenses," Working Paper 18-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    4. David A. Swanson & Jack Baker, 2019. "Estimating the underlying infant mortality rates for small populations: an historical study of US counties in 1970," Journal of Population Research, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 233-244, September.
    5. Spears, Dean, 2020. "Exposure to open defecation can account for the Indian enigma of child height," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C).
    6. Butikofer, Aline & Loken, Katrine & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2018. "Infant Health Care and Long-Term," CEPR Discussion Papers 13064, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Persson, Petra & Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2019. "When Dad Can Stay Home: Fathers’ Workplace Flexibility and Maternal Health," Working Paper Series 1284, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    8. Butikofer, Aline & Løken, Katrine & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2016. "Infant Health Care and Long-Term Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 11652, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Benjamin Sosnaud, 2022. "Reconceptualizing Measures of Black–White Disparity in Infant Mortality in U.S. Counties," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 41(4), pages 1779-1808, August.
    10. Sievertsen, Hans Henrik & Wüst, Miriam, 2017. "Discharge on the day of birth, parental response and health and schooling outcomes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 121-138.
    11. Jonathan Colmer & Dajun Lin & Siying Liu & Jay Shimshack, 2020. "Why are pollution damages lower in developed countries? Insights from high income, high-particulate matter Hong Kong," CEP Discussion Papers dp1702, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Wen Fan & Liying Luo, 2020. "Understanding Trends in the Concentration of Infant Mortality Among Disadvantaged White and Black Mothers in the United States, 1983–2013: A Decomposition Analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 979-1005, June.
    13. Aline Bütikofer & René Karadakic & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2021. "Income Inequality and Mortality: A Norwegian Perspective," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 42(1), pages 193-221, March.
    14. Altindag, Onur & Greve, Jane & Tekin, Erdal, 2022. "Public Health Policy at Scale: Impact of a Government-Sponsored Information Campaign on Infant Mortality in Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 15398, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Tiffany Green & Tod Hamilton, 2019. "Maternal educational attainment and infant mortality in the United States: Does the gradient vary by race/ethnicity and nativity?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 41(25), pages 713-752.
    16. Coffey, Diane & Spears, Dean, 2019. "Neonatal Death in India: Birth Order in a Context of Maternal Undernutrition," IZA Discussion Papers 12288, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Schwandt, Hannes, 2017. "The Lasting Legacy of Seasonal Influenza: In-Utero Exposure and Labor Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 10589, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. David Rothwell & Leanne Giordono & Jennifer Robson, 2020. "Public Income Transfers and Wealth Accumulation at the Bottom: Within and Between Country Differences in Canada and the United States," LWS Working papers 31, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    19. Huttunen, Kristiina & Lombardi, Stefano, 2021. "Mortality Inequality in Finland," Working Papers 140, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    20. Dian Kristiani Irawaty & Indra Elfiyan & Edy Purwoko, 2021. "Exploring the Factors Associated with Infant Mortality in Rural Indonesia," Global Journal of Health Science, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 13(1), pages 1-17, January.
    21. Mark E. McGovern, 2016. "Progress and the Lack of Progress in Addressing Infant Health and Infant Health Inequalities in Ireland during the 20th Century," Economics Working Papers 16-05, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast.
    22. Banerjee, Rakesh & Maharaj, Riddhi, 2020. "Heat, infant mortality, and adaptation: Evidence from India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C).

  7. Chen, Alice J., 2012. "When does weight matter most?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 285-295.

    Cited by:

    1. Hasanzadeh, Samira & Alishahi, Modjgan, 2020. "COVID-19 Pounds: Quarantine and Weight Gain," MPRA Paper 102679, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mazhar, Ummad & Rehman, Fahd, 2022. "Productivity, obesity, and human capital: Panel data evidence," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 44(C).
    3. Donna B. Gilleskie & Euna Han & Edward C. Norton, 2016. "Disentangling the Contemporaneous and Dynamic Effects of Human and Health Capital on Wages over the Life Cycle," NBER Working Papers 22430, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Frieder Kropfhäußer & Marco Sunder, 2014. "A Weighty Issue Revisited: The Dynamic Effect of Body Weight on Earnings and Satisfaction in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 635, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Kropfhäußer, Frieder & Sunder, Marco, 2013. "A weighty issue revisited: the dynamic effect of body weight on earnings and satisfaction in Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79895, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Hasanzadeh, Samira & Alishahi, Modjgan, 2020. "COVID-19 Pounds: Quarantine and Weight Gain," MPRA Paper 103074, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Pinkston, Joshua, 2015. "The Dynamic Effects of Obesity on the Wages of Young Workers," MPRA Paper 64641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Liisa T. Laine & Ari Hyytinen, 2022. "Temporary and persistent overweight and long-term labor market outcomes," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 181-203, June.
    9. Lee, Wang-Sheng, 2014. "Big and Tall: Is there a Height Premium or Obesity Penalty in the Labor Market?," IZA Discussion Papers 8606, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2014-12-08 2015-09-05 2016-03-23
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2014-12-08
  3. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2015-09-05
  4. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2014-12-08

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