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Disentangling the Contemporaneous and Dynamic Effects of Human and Health Capital on Wages over the Life Cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Donna B. Gilleskie
  • Euna Han
  • Edward C. Norton

Abstract

In this study we quantify the life-cycle effects of human and health capital on the wage distribution of females, with a focus on health measured by body mass. We use NLSY79 data on women followed annually up to twenty years during the time of their lives when average annual weight gain is greatest. We allow body mass to explain variation in wages contemporaneously conditional on observed measures of human capital and productivity histories (namely, education, employment experience, marital status, and family size) and dynamically over the life cycle through its impact on the endogenous histories of behaviors that determine wages. We find significant differences in the contemporaneous effect and the dynamic effect of body mass on wages, both across females of different races and over the distribution of wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Donna B. Gilleskie & Euna Han & Edward C. Norton, 2016. "Disentangling the Contemporaneous and Dynamic Effects of Human and Health Capital on Wages over the Life Cycle," NBER Working Papers 22430, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22430
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gilleskie, Donna B. & Mroz, Thomas A., 2004. "A flexible approach for estimating the effects of covariates on health expenditures," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 391-418, March.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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