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Eli Spiegelman

Personal Details

First Name:Eli
Middle Name:
Last Name:Spiegelman
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psp126

Affiliation

(88%) Centre de Recherche sur l'Emploi et les Fluctuations Économiques (CREFÉ)
École des Sciences de la Gestion (ESG)
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Montréal, Canada
http://ideas.uqam.ca/CREFE/

: (514)987-6181
(514)987-4707
Case postale 8888, succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal (Québec) H3C 3P8
RePEc:edi:crefeca (more details at EDIRC)

(12%) Department of Economics and Political Science
Vanier College

St-Laurent, Canada
http://www.vaniercollege.qc.ca/social-science/economics-political-science/

:


RePEc:edi:devanca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. López-Pérez, Raúl & Spiegelman, Eli, 2012. "Do Economists Lie More?," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2012/04, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).

Articles

  1. Raúl López-Pérez & Eli Spiegelman, 2013. "Why do people tell the truth? Experimental evidence for pure lie aversion," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(3), pages 233-247, September.
  2. Eli Spiegelman & George Spiegelman & Jonah Spiegelman, 2007. "Money as Social Exergy," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 265-277, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. López-Pérez, Raúl & Spiegelman, Eli, 2012. "Do Economists Lie More?," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2012/04, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Economists lie more
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-02-29 20:54:00
    2. Assorted Links
      by Xiaoyu Lu in Penny's innocent ideas on 2012-03-01 17:36:00
    3. Would I lie to you?
      by Inaki Villanueva in Applied economist on 2012-04-01 16:27:00

Working papers

  1. López-Pérez, Raúl & Spiegelman, Eli, 2012. "Do Economists Lie More?," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2012/04, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).

    Cited by:

    1. Muñoz-Izquierdo, Nora & Gil-Gómez de Liaño, Beatriz & Rin-Sánchez, Francisco Daniel & Pascual-Ezama, David, 2014. "Economists: cheaters with altruistic instincts," MPRA Paper 60678, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Banerjee, Ritwik, 2016. "Corruption, norm violation and decay in social capital," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 14-27.
    3. Raúl López-Pérez & Eli Spiegelman, 2013. "Why do people tell the truth? Experimental evidence for pure lie aversion," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(3), pages 233-247, September.
    4. Reuben, Ernesto & Stephenson, Matthew, 2012. "Nobody Likes a Rat: On the Willingness and Consequences of Reporting Lies," IZA Discussion Papers 6998, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Grosch, Kerstin & Rau, Holger A., 2017. "Gender differences in honesty: The role of social value orientation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 258-267.
    6. Behnk, Sascha & Barreda-Tarrazona, Iván & García-Gallego, Aurora, 2014. "The role of ex post transparency in information transmission—An experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 45-64.
    7. Reuben, Ernesto & Stephenson, Matt, 2013. "Nobody likes a rat: On the willingness to report lies and the consequences thereof," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 384-391.

Articles

  1. Raúl López-Pérez & Eli Spiegelman, 2013. "Why do people tell the truth? Experimental evidence for pure lie aversion," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(3), pages 233-247, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Chlaß, Nadine & Riener, Gerhard, 2015. "Lying, Spying, Sabotaging -- Balancing Means and Aims --," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113222, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Olga A. Rud & Jean Paul Rabanal & John Horowitz, 2016. "Does Competition Aggravate Moral Hazard? A Multi-Principal-Agent Experiment," Working Papers 2016-86, Peruvian Economic Association.
    3. Chlaß, Nadine & Riener, Gerhard, 2015. "Lying, spying, sabotaging: Procedures and consequences," DICE Discussion Papers 196, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    4. Hermann, Daniel & Ostermaier, Andreas, 2018. "Be close to me and I will be honest: How social distance influences honesty," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 340, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Natalia Borzino & Enrique Fatas & Emmanuel Peterle, 2016. "In Gov We Trust: Voluntary compliance in networked investment games," Working Papers hal-01375081, HAL.
    6. Christoph Feldhaus & Johannes Mans, 2014. "Who do you lie to? Social identity and the cost of lying," Working Paper Series in Economics 76, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    7. Julien Benistant & Marie Claire Villeval, 2017. "Unethical Behavior and Group Identity in Contests," Working Papers halshs-01592007, HAL.
    8. Pigors, Mark & Rockenbach, Bettina, 2016. "The competitive advantage of honesty," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 407-424.
    9. Feltovich, Nick & Giovannoni, Francesco, 2015. "Selection vs. accountability: An experimental investigation of campaign promises in a moral-hazard environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 39-51.
    10. Valeria Maggian & Marie Claire Villeval, 2015. "Social preferences and lying aversion in children," Working Papers halshs-00924980, HAL.
    11. Cappelen, Alexander W. & Sørensen, Erik Ø. & Tungodden, Bertil, 2013. "When do we lie?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 258-265.
    12. Rigby, Dan & Burton, Michael & Balcombe, Kelvin & Bateman, Ian & Mulatu, Abay, 2015. "Contract cheating & the market in essays," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 23-37.
    13. Gibson, Rajna & Tanner, Carmen & Wagner, Alexander F, 2014. "The Choice of Honesty: An Experiment Regarding Heterogeneous Responses to Situational Social Norms," CEPR Discussion Papers 9880, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Antonio Cabrales & Francesco Feri & Piero Gottardi & Miguel A. Meléndez-Jiménez, 2018. "Can there be a Market for Cheap-Talk Information? An Experimental Investigation," CESifo Working Paper Series 6975, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Koessler, Ann-Kathrin & Page, Lionel & Dulleck, Uwe, 2015. "Promoting pro-social behavior with public statements of good intent," MPRA Paper 80072, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 24 May 2017.
    16. Fabio Galeotti, 2017. "When Foul Play Seems Fair: Dishonesty as a Response to Violations of Just Deserts," Post-Print halshs-01657322, HAL.
    17. Tobias Gesche, 2016. "De-biasing strategic communication," ECON - Working Papers 216, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Jul 2017.
    18. Simon Gaechter, 2014. "Human Pro-Social Motivation and the Maintenance of Social Order," Discussion Papers 2014-02, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    19. López Pérez, Raúl & Ramírez Zamudio, Aldo., 2018. "Social norms and tax compliance: Experiments and theory," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2018/02, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
    20. Sascha Behnk & Iván Barreda-Tarrazona & Aurora García-Gallego, 2017. "An experimental test of reporting systems for deception," Working Papers 2017/11, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    21. Dugar, Subhasish & Bhattacharya, Haimanti, 2017. "Fishy behavior: A field experiment on (dis)honesty in the marketplace," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 41-55.
    22. Behnk, Sascha & Barreda-Tarrazona, Iván & García-Gallego, Aurora, 2014. "The role of ex post transparency in information transmission—An experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 45-64.
    23. Brinja Meiseberg & Thomas Ehrmann & Aloys Prinz, 2017. "“Anything worth winning is worth cheating for”? Determinants of cheating behavior among business and theology students," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 87(8), pages 985-1016, November.
    24. López-Pérez, Raúl & Spiegelman, Eli, 2012. "Do Economists Lie More?," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2012/04, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
    25. Ferreira, Mark, 2017. "When knowledge is not power: Asymmetric information, probabilistic deceit detection and threats in ultimatum bargainingAuthor-Name: Chavanne, David," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 4-17.
    26. Ronald Peeters & Marc Vorsatz & Markus Walzl, 2012. "Beliefs and truth-telling: A laboratory experiment," Working Papers 2012-17, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, revised Nov 2014.
    27. Rud, Olga A. & Rabanal, Jean Paul & Horowitz, John, 2018. "Does competition aggravate moral hazard? A Multi-Principal-Agent experiment," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 115-121.
    28. Drupp, Moritz A. & Khadjavi, Menusch & Quaas, Martin F., 2016. "Truth-telling and the regulator: Evidence from a field experiment with commercial fishermen," Kiel Working Papers 2063, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    29. Anbarcı, Nejat & Feltovich, Nick & Gürdal, Mehmet Y., 2015. "Lying about the price? Ultimatum bargaining with messages and imperfectly observed offers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 346-360.
    30. Bernd Irlenbusch & Marie Claire Villeval, 2015. "Behavioral ethics: how psychology influenced economics and how economics might inform psychology?," Post-Print halshs-01159696, HAL.
    31. Huseyn Ismayilov & Jan Potters, 2016. "Why do promises affect trustworthiness, or do they?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(2), pages 382-393, June.

  2. Eli Spiegelman & George Spiegelman & Jonah Spiegelman, 2007. "Money as Social Exergy," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 265-277, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Kyrke Gaudreau & Roydon A. Fraser & Stephen Murphy, 2012. "The Characteristics of the Exergy Reference Environment and Its Implications for Sustainability-Based Decision-Making," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(7), pages 1-17, July.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2012-02-20
  2. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2012-02-20
  3. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2012-02-20
  4. NEP-SOG: Sociology of Economics (1) 2012-02-20

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