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Lily Qiu

Personal Details

First Name:Lily
Middle Name:
Last Name:Qiu
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RePEc Short-ID:pqi19
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Research output

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Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Lily Qiu & Ivo Welch, 2004. "Investor Sentiment Measures," NBER Working Papers 10794, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Lily Qiu, 2003. "Public Pension Fund Activism and M&A Activity," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm398, Yale School of Management.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Lily Qiu & Ivo Welch, 2004. "Investor Sentiment Measures," NBER Working Papers 10794, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ding, Zhihua & Liu, Zhenhua & Zhang, Yuejun & Long, Ruyin, 2017. "The contagion effect of international crude oil price fluctuations on Chinese stock market investor sentiment," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 27-36.
    2. Po-Keng Cheng & Young Shin Kim & David McMillan, 2017. "Speculative bubbles and crashes: Fundamentalists and positive‐feedback trading," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 1381370-138, January.
    3. Keiber, Karl Ludwig & Samyschew, Helene, 2017. "The world price of sentiment risk," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 62-82.
    4. Schmeling, Maik, 2009. "Investor sentiment and stock returns: Some international evidence," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 394-408, June.
    5. Bethke, Sebastian & Kempf, Alexander & Trapp, Monika, 2013. "The correlation puzzle: The interaction of bond and risk correlation," CFR Working Papers 13-06, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).
    6. Shen, Dehua & Li, Xiao & Zhang, Wei, 2018. "Baidu news information flow and return volatility: Evidence for the Sequential Information Arrival Hypothesis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 127-133.
    7. Caglayan, Mustafa & Xu, Bing, 2016. "Sentiment volatility and bank lending behavior," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 107-120.
    8. Haiqiang Chen & Terence Tai-Leung Chong & Xin Duan, 2010. "A principal-component approach to measuring investor sentiment," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 339-347.
    9. Bucher, Melk C., 2017. "Investor Attention and Sentiment: Risk or Anomaly?," Working Papers on Finance 1712, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    10. Hurst, Gareth & Docherty, Paul, 2015. "Trend salience, investor behaviours and momentum profitability," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 35(PB), pages 471-484.
    11. Piñeiro-Chousa, Juan Ramón & López-Cabarcos, M. Ángeles & Pérez-Pico, Ada María, 2016. "Examining the influence of stock market variables on microblogging sentiment," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 2087-2092.
    12. Tang, Dragon Yongjun & Yan, Hong, 2008. "Market conditions, default risk and credit spreads," Discussion Paper Series 2: Banking and Financial Studies 2008,08, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    13. Ramiah, Vikash & Xu, Xiaoming & Moosa, Imad A., 2015. "Neoclassical finance, behavioral finance and noise traders: A review and assessment of the literature," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 89-100.
    14. Li, Xindan & Geng, Ziyang & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar & Yu, Honghai, 2017. "Do wealthy investors have an informational advantage? Evidence based on account classifications of individual investors," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-18.
    15. Baker, Malcolm & Wurgler, Jeffrey & Yuan, Yu, 2012. "Global, local, and contagious investor sentiment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 272-287.
    16. Eugene Amromin & Steven A. Sharpe, 2012. "From the horse’s mouth: how do investor expectations of risk and return vary with economic conditions?," Working Paper Series WP-2012-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    17. Michael Nofer & Oliver Hinz, 2015. "Using Twitter to Predict the Stock Market," Business & Information Systems Engineering: The International Journal of WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK, Springer;Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI), vol. 57(4), pages 229-242, August.
    18. Burdekin, Richard C.K. & Redfern, Luke, 2009. "Sentiment effects on Chinese share prices and savings deposits: The post-2003 experience," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 246-261, June.
    19. Kamini Solanki & Yudhvir Seetharam, 2014. "Is consumer confidence an indicator of JSE performance?," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 8(3), September.
    20. M. Zouaoui & G. Nouyrigat & F. Beer, 2010. "How does investor sentiment affect stock market crises? Evidence from panel data," Post-Print halshs-00534754, HAL.
    21. Donadelli, Michael & Kizys, Renatas & Riedel, Max, 2017. "Dangerous infectious diseases: Bad news for Main Street, good news for Wall Street?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 84-103.
    22. Eugene Amromin & Steven A. Sharpe, 2008. "Expectations of risk and return among household investors: Are their Sharpe ratios countercyclical?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-17, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2004-07-18

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