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Dangerous infectious diseases: Bad news for Main Street, good news for Wall Street?

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  • Donadelli, Michael
  • Kizys, Renatas
  • Riedel, Max

Abstract

We examine whether investor mood, driven by World Health Organization (WHO) alerts and media news on dangerous infectious diseases, is priced in pharmaceutical companies' stocks in the United States. We argue that disease-related news (DRNs) should not trigger rational trading. We find that DRNs have a positive and significant sentiment effect among investors (on Wall Street). The effect is stronger (weaker) for small (large) companies, who are less (more) likely to engage in the development of new vaccines. A potential negative investor climate (on Main Street) – induced by disease-related fear – does not alter the positive sentiment effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Donadelli, Michael & Kizys, Renatas & Riedel, Max, 2017. "Dangerous infectious diseases: Bad news for Main Street, good news for Wall Street?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 84-103.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finmar:v:35:y:2017:i:c:p:84-103
    DOI: 10.1016/j.finmar.2016.12.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramelli, Stefano & Wagner, Alexander F, 2020. "Feverish Stock Price Reactions to COVID-19," CEPR Discussion Papers 14511, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    3. Donadelli, Michael & Lalanne, Marie, 2020. "Sex and “the City”: Financial stress and online pornography consumption," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C).
    4. Pandey, Dharen Kumar & Kumari, Vineeta, 2021. "Event study on the reaction of the developed and emerging stock markets to the 2019-nCoV outbreak," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 467-483.
    5. Haroon, Omair & Rizvi, Syed Aun R., 2020. "COVID-19: Media coverage and financial markets behavior—A sectoral inquiry," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C).
    6. Donadelli, Michael & Gufler, Ivan & Pellizzari, Paolo, 2020. "The macro and asset pricing implications of rising Italian uncertainty: Evidence from a novel news-based macroeconomic policy uncertainty index," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 197(C).
    7. Schell, Daniel & Wang, Mei & Huynh, Toan Luu Duc, 2020. "This time is indeed different: A study on global market reactions to public health crisis," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    WHO alerts; Investor sentiment; Pharmaceutical industry; Trading strategies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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