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Vibeke Myrup Jensen

Personal Details

First Name:Vibeke
Middle Name:Myrup
Last Name:Jensen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pje170
http://gl.sfi.dk/vibeke_myrup_jensen-1537.aspx

Affiliation

Nationale Forsknings- og Analysecenter for Velfærd (VIVE)

København, Denmark
http://www.vive.dk/

+45 33 48 08 00

Herluf Trolles Gade 11, DK-1052 Copenhagen
RePEc:edi:sfikodk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Paul Bingley & Vibeke Myrup Jensen & Ian Walker, 2007. "The Effect of School Class Size on Post-Compulsory Education: Some Cost Benefit Analysis," Working Papers 200717, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

Articles

  1. Jensen, Vibeke Myrup & Wüst, Miriam, 2015. "Can Caesarean section improve child and maternal health? The case of breech babies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 289-302.
  2. Vibeke Myrup Jensen, 2014. "Happy Doctor Makes Happy Baby? Incentivizing Physicians Improves Quality of Prenatal Care," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(5), pages 838-848, December.
  3. Anders Hoest & Vibeke Myrup Jensen & Lisbeth Palmhoej Nielsen, 2013. "Increasing the admission rate to upper secondary school: the case of lower secondary school student career guidance," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 213-229, July.
  4. Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Vibeke Jensen & Dorthe Pedersen & Inge Petersen & Paul Bingley & Kaare Christensen, 2011. "Does More Schooling Reduce Hospitalization and Delay Mortality? New Evidence Based on Danish Twins," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(4), pages 1347-1375, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Paul Bingley & Vibeke Myrup Jensen & Ian Walker, 2007. "The Effect of School Class Size on Post-Compulsory Education: Some Cost Benefit Analysis," Working Papers 200717, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

    Cited by:

    1. Desire Kedagni & Kala Krishna & Rigissa Megalokonomou & Yingyan Zhao, 2019. "Does Class Size Matter? How, and at What Cost?," NBER Working Papers 25736, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Fredriksson, Peter & Öckert, Björn & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 2011. "Long-Term Effects of Class Size," IZA Discussion Papers 5879, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Christopher Jepsen, 2015. "Class size: Does it matter for student achievement?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 190-190, September.

Articles

  1. Jensen, Vibeke Myrup & Wüst, Miriam, 2015. "Can Caesarean section improve child and maternal health? The case of breech babies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 289-302.

    Cited by:

    1. Halla, Martin & Mayr, Harald & Pruckner, Gerald J. & García-Gómez, Pilar, 2020. "Cutting fertility? Effects of cesarean deliveries on subsequent fertility and maternal labor supply," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    2. Maruyama, Shiko & Heinesen, Eskil, 2020. "Another look at returns to birthweight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
    3. Hope Corman & Dhaval M. Dave & Nancy E. Reichman, 2017. "Evolution of the Infant Health Production Function," Working Papers id:12331, eSocialSciences.
    4. Costa-Ramón, Ana & Kortelainen, Mika & Rodríguez-González, Ana & Sääksvuori, Lauri, 2019. "The Long-Run Effects of Cesarean Sections," Working Papers 125, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Guccio, Calogero & Lisi, Domenico, 2016. "Thus do all. Social interactions in inappropriate behavior for childbirth services in a highly decentralized healthcare system," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-17.
    6. Barili, E; & Bertoli, P; & Grembi, V;, 2020. "Title: Fees equalization and Appropriate Health Care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 20/09, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    7. Costa-Ramón, Ana María & Rodríguez-González, Ana & Serra-Burriel, Miquel & Campillo-Artero, Carlos, 2018. "It's about time: Cesarean sections and neonatal health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 46-59.
    8. Tonei, Valentina, 2019. "Mother’s mental health after childbirth: Does the delivery method matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 182-196.
    9. Sofia Amaral‐Garcia & Paola Bertoli & Veronica Grembi, 2015. "Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices? Evidence from Italy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1050-1064, September.
    10. Emilia Barili & Paola Bertoli & Veronica Grembi, 2020. "Fee Equalization and Appropriate Health Care," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp664, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    11. Valentina Tonei, 2017. "Mother’s health after childbirth: does delivery method matter?," Discussion Papers 17/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
    12. Sofia Amaral-Garcia & Paola Bertoli & Veronica Grembi, 2015. "Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices? Evidence From Geographical Discontinuities in Italy," CEIS Research Paper 342, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 May 2015.
    13. David Card & Alessandra Fenizia & David Silver, 2019. "The Health Impacts of Hospital Delivery Practices," NBER Working Papers 25986, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Vibeke Myrup Jensen, 2014. "Happy Doctor Makes Happy Baby? Incentivizing Physicians Improves Quality of Prenatal Care," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(5), pages 838-848, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Hope Corman & Dhaval M. Dave & Nancy E. Reichman, 2017. "Evolution of the Infant Health Production Function," Working Papers id:12331, eSocialSciences.
    2. Sara Allin & Michael Baker & Maripier Isabelle & Mark Stabile, 2015. "Accounting for the Rise in C-sections: Evidence from Population Level Data," NBER Working Papers 21022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Carroll, Caitlin & Chernew, Michael & Fendrick, A. Mark & Thompson, Joe & Rose, Sherri, 2018. "Effects of episode-based payment on health care spending and utilization: Evidence from perinatal care in Arkansas," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 47-62.
    4. Caitlin Carroll & Michael Chernew & A. Mark Fendrick & Joe Thompson & Sherri Rose, 2017. "Effects of Episode-Based Payment on Health Care Spending and Utilization: Evidence from Perinatal Care in Arkansas," NBER Working Papers 23926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Anders Hoest & Vibeke Myrup Jensen & Lisbeth Palmhoej Nielsen, 2013. "Increasing the admission rate to upper secondary school: the case of lower secondary school student career guidance," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 213-229, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Lex Borghans & Bart H H Golsteyn & Anders Stenberg, 2015. "Does Expert Advice Improve Educational Choice?," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(12), pages 1-28, December.

  4. Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Vibeke Jensen & Dorthe Pedersen & Inge Petersen & Paul Bingley & Kaare Christensen, 2011. "Does More Schooling Reduce Hospitalization and Delay Mortality? New Evidence Based on Danish Twins," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(4), pages 1347-1375, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Vikesh Amin & Jere R. Behrman, 2011. "Do More-Schooled Women have Fewer Children and Delay Childbearing? Evidence from a Sample of U.S. Twins," PIER Working Paper Archive 11-041, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    2. Petter Lundborg; & Carl Hampus Lyttkens; & Paul Nystedt;, 2012. "Human capital and longevity. Evidence from 50,000 twins," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/19, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Kohler, Hans-Peter, 2015. "Schooling has smaller or insignificant effects on adult health in the US than suggested by cross-sectional associations: New estimates using relatively large samples of identical twins," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 181-189.
    4. Michael Grossman, 2015. "The Relationship between Health and Schooling: What’s New?," NBER Working Papers 21609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Behrman, Jere R. & Xiong, Yanyan & Zhang, Junsen, 2015. "Cross-sectional schooling-health associations misrepresented causal schooling effects on adult health and health-related behaviors: Evidence from the Chinese Adults Twins Survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 190-197.
    6. Øystein Kravdal & Emily Grundy & Katherine Keenan, 2018. "The increasing mortality advantage of the married: The role played by education," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(20), pages 471-512.
    7. Petter Lundborg, 2013. "The health returns to schooling—what can we learn from twins?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 673-701, April.
    8. Kai Hong & Peter Savelyev & Kegon Teng Kok Tan, 2020. "Understanding the Mechanisms Linking College Education with Longevity," Working Papers 2020-022, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    9. Liliya Leopold, 2018. "Education and Physical Health Trajectories in Later Life: A Comparative Study," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(3), pages 901-927, June.
    10. Madsen, Mia & Andersen, Per K. & Gerster, Mette & Andersen, Anne-Marie N. & Christensen, Kaare & Osler, Merete, 2014. "Are the educational differences in incidence of cardiovascular disease explained by underlying familial factors? A twin study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 182-190.
    11. Lång, Elisabeth & Nystedt, Paul, 2018. "Blowing up money? The earnings penalty of smoking in the 1970s and the 21st century," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 39-52.
    12. Petter Lundborg & Carl Hampus Lyttkens & Paul Nystedt, 2016. "The Effect of Schooling on Mortality: New Evidence From 50,000 Swedish Twins," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(4), pages 1135-1168, August.
    13. Sudharsanan, Nikkil & Behrman, Jere R. & Kohler, Hans-Peter, 2016. "Limited common origins of multiple adult health-related behaviors: Evidence from U.S. twins," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 67-83.
    14. Adriana Lleras-Muney & Joseph Price & Dahai Yue, 2020. "The Association Between Educational Attainment and Longevity using Individual Level Data from the 1940 Census," NBER Working Papers 27514, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Ma, Yuanyuan & Nolan, Anne & Smith, James P., 2018. "The value of education to health: Evidence from Ireland," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 14-25.
    16. Andrew Halpern-Manners & Jonas Helgertz & John Robert Warren & Evan Roberts, 2020. "The Effects of Education on Mortality: Evidence From Linked U.S. Census and Administrative Mortality Data," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(4), pages 1513-1541, August.
    17. Gibson, John & Stillman, Steven & McKenzie, David & Rohorua, Halahingano, 2010. "Natural Experiment Evidence on the Effect of Migration on Blood Pressure and Hypertension," IZA Discussion Papers 5232, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Robert Lucas & Sari Kerr, 2013. "Intergenerational income immobility in Finland: contrasting roles for parental earnings and family income," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(3), pages 1057-1094, July.
    19. Böckerman, Petri & Maczulskij, Terhi, 2016. "The Education-health Nexus: Fact and fiction," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 112-116.
    20. Hayward, Mark D. & Hummer, Robert A. & Sasson, Isaac, 2015. "Trends and group differences in the association between educational attainment and U.S. adult mortality: Implications for understanding education's causal influence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 8-18.
    21. Jere R. Behrman & Yuan Hu & Junsen Zhang, 2020. "The Causal Effects of Parents’ Schooling on Children’s Schooling in Urban China," PIER Working Paper Archive 20-005, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    22. Naomi Duke & Ross Macmillan, 2016. "Schooling, skills, and self-rated health: A test of conventional wisdom on the relationship between educational attainment and health," Working Papers 087, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    23. Ruben Castro & Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2015. "Perception of HIV risk and the quantity and quality of children: the case of rural Malawi," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 113-132, January.
    24. Bijwaard, Govert & Myrskylä, Mikko & Tynelius, Per, 2018. "The Impact of Mental Problems on Mortality and How It Is Moderated by Education," IZA Discussion Papers 11591, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    25. Jared C. Carbone & Snorre Kverndokk, 2016. "Individual Investments in Education and Health: Policy Responses and Interactions," CESifo Working Paper Series 6154, CESifo.
    26. Avendano, M.; de Coulon, A.; Nafilyan, V.;, 2017. "Does more education always improve mental health? Evidence from a British compulsory schooling reform," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/10, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    27. Lynch, Jamie L. & von Hippel, Paul T., 2016. "An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 18-27.
    28. Peter Savelyev & Benjamin Ward & Bob Krueger & Matthew McGue, 2020. "Health Endowments, Schooling Allocation in the Family, and Longevity: Evidence from US Twins," Working Papers 2020-040, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    29. Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Spector, Tim D., 2013. "Does more schooling improve health outcomes and health related behaviors? Evidence from U.K. twins," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 134-148.
    30. Isaac Sasson, 2016. "Trends in Life Expectancy and Lifespan Variation by Educational Attainment: United States, 1990–2010," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(2), pages 269-293, April.
    31. Titus J. Galama & Adriana Lleras-Muney & Hans van Kippersluis, 2018. "The Effect of Education on Health and Mortality: A Review of Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence," NBER Working Papers 24225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    32. Jennifer Karas Montez & Kaitlyn Barnes, 2016. "The Benefits of Educational Attainment for U.S. Adult Mortality: Are they Contingent on the Broader Environment?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(1), pages 73-100, February.
    33. Avendano, Mauricio & de Coulon, Augustin & Nafilyan, Vahé, 2020. "Does longer compulsory schooling affect mental health? Evidence from a British reform," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 183(C).

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2008-05-24
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2008-05-24

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