IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/wfo/wstudy/25452.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

AccessLab: Drawing Conclusions and Deriving Policy Implications

Author

Listed:
  • Jan Fidrmuc

    (Centre for European Integration Studies)

  • Peter Huber

    (Austrian Institute of Economic Research)

Abstract

This analysis of regional labour market disparities in new member states and candidate countries summarises the results of the AccessLab project and presents some data. Large and persistent regional labour market disparities developed in virtually all new member states and candidate countries and there is some evidence of polarisation. Differences in starting conditions and market access seem to be the major reasons for regional divergence in transition. Furthermore, regional wages are only slightly more flexible than in many EU labour markets, inter-regional migration is low and capital seems to move towards high wage and low unemployment urban centres rather than to the most backward regions. Policy should thus take a long-run perspective on the existing regional disparities, focus on removing barriers to mobility, review existing institutions for implementing regional policy and aim at a close co-ordination of regional and labour market policy instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Fidrmuc & Peter Huber, 2005. "AccessLab: Drawing Conclusions and Deriving Policy Implications," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 25452, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wstudy:25452
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.wifo.ac.at/wwa/pubid/25452
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. von Hagen, Jürgen & Hepp, Ralf, 2000. "Regional risksharing and redistribution in the German federation," ZEI Working Papers B 15-2000, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
    2. Huber, Peter, 2004. "Intra-national labor market adjustment in the candidate countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 248-264, June.
    3. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2004. "Migration and regional adjustment to asymmetric shocks in transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 230-247, June.
    4. Chiara Bentivogli & Patrizio Pagano, 1999. "Regional Disparities and Labour Mobility: the Euro-11 versus the USA," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 13(3), pages 737-760, September.
    5. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 2000. "Estimating the Effect of Currency Unions on Trade and Output," NBER Working Papers 7857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Babetskii, Ian & Boone, Laurence & Maurel, Mathilde, 2002. "Exchange Rate Regimes and Supply Shocks Asymmetry: The Case of the Accession Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 3408, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Frankel, Jeffrey A & Rose, Andrew K, 2000. "An Estimate of the Effect of Currency Unions on Trade and Output," CEPR Discussion Papers 2631, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Boone, Laurence & Maurel, Mathilde, 1999. "An Optimal Currency Area Perspective of the EU Enlargement to the CEECs," CEPR Discussion Papers 2119, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bartlomiej ROKICKI & Mieczyslaw W. SOCHA, 2008. "Effects of Poland's Integration with the EU: Structural Interventions and Economic Development in the Eastern Border Regions," The Journal of Comparative Economic Studies (JCES), The Japanese Society for Comparative Economic Studies (JSCES), vol. 4, pages 81-114, December.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wfo:wstudy:25452. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ilse Schulz). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wifooat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.