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Promoting Inclusive Growth : Challenges and Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Luiz de Mello
  • Mark A. Dutz

Abstract

Countries worldwide face challenges of high unemployment, unsustainable public finances and lower potential output. It is pertinent therefore to understand future challenges and devise policies accordingly. This document contains the proceedings of a conference co-hosted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the World Bank in 2011. The policy issues highlighted herein include financial development, social policies, innovation, regulation, and political economy issues. The importance of structural reform, and exploiting synergies among policy domains are explored. It is understood that structural reforms can do much to unleash opportunities for investment and to allow countries to tap new sources of growth. They can also address issues of inclusiveness and social cohesion, ensuring that the benefits of sustained growth are shared equitably. Exploiting synergies among policy domains is also essential. For example, innovation calls for investment in human resources and appropriate competition policies to encourage entrepreneurship. Innovation is a key pillar of green growth, which is about greening old activities by harnessing knowledge and new technologies that can also create jobs and promote welfare in an environmentally sustainable manner.

Suggested Citation

  • Luiz de Mello & Mark A. Dutz, 2012. "Promoting Inclusive Growth : Challenges and Policies," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16948, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:16948
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hartmann, Dominik & Guevara, Miguel R. & Jara-Figueroa, Cristian & Aristarán, Manuel & Hidalgo, César A., 2017. "Linking Economic Complexity, Institutions, and Income Inequality," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 75-93.
    2. Stefan Thewissen & Lane Kenworthy & Brian Nolan & Max Roser & Timothy Smeeding, 2015. "Rising Income Inequality and Living Standards in OECD Countries: How Does the Middle Fare?," LIS Working papers 656, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    3. Siegmann, K.A. & Majid, H., 2014. "Empowering growth in Pakistan?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 595, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    4. Rafael Ranieri & Raquel Almeida Ramos, 2013. "Inclusive Growth: Building up a Concept," Working Papers 104, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    5. Dutz, Mark A. & O'Connell, Stephen D., 2013. "Productivity, innovation and growth in Sri Lanka : an empirical investigation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6354, The World Bank.

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