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Optimal Bank Capital And Impact Of The Mm Theorem: A Study Of The Pakistani Financial Sector

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  • SUMERA ANIS

    () (Institute of Islamic Banking (IIB), University of Management and Technology (UMT), Lahore, Pakistan)

  • ABDUL RASHID

    (International Institute of Islamic Economics (IIIE), International Islamic University (IIU), Islamabad, Pakistan)

Abstract

The financial sector of Pakistan is showing stability and resilience to financial shocks. Further, with increased ratios for equity capital, its performance is robust and strong. Globally improved financial conditions are also benefiting it. The banking industry is working under competitive environment that is further illustrated by low bank spreads, lower figures for non-performing loans, higher capital adequacy ratios and increased total assets. This study is done with the aim to investigate the newly recommended capital obligations by Basel III, which has created a debate for and against it. It is argued that it will lead to increased lending rate and shrink loan growth and credit supply. Proposed higher capital levels will increase marginal cost for funds which will result in higher rates for lending. For Pakistani banks, this study depicts that overall changes are negligible if funding mixture is changed. Further, the modigliani and miller (MM) offset is illustrating its full impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Sumera Anis & Abdul Rashid, 2017. "Optimal Bank Capital And Impact Of The Mm Theorem: A Study Of The Pakistani Financial Sector," Annals of Financial Economics (AFE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 12(02), pages 1-21, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:afexxx:v:12:y:2017:i:02:n:s2010495217500087
    DOI: 10.1142/S2010495217500087
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    References listed on IDEAS

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