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FDI and pollution: a granger causality test using panel data

  • Robert Hoffmann

    (School of Business, Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

  • Chew-Ging Lee

    (Nottingham University Business School, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

  • Bala Ramasamy

    (Nottingham University Business School, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

  • Matthew Yeung

    (School of Business, Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

This study reports the findings of Granger causality tests on the relationship between FDI and pollution across 112 countries over 15-28 years. Our results uncover alternative causality relationships between the two variables depending on a host country's level of development. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1196
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 17 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 311-317

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:17:y:2005:i:3:p:311-317
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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