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The effects of income, education and age on health

Author

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  • Olga Kiuila

    (Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland)

  • Peter Mieszkowski

    (Rice University, Houston, TX, USA)

Abstract

We use the core interviews of the US Health Interview Survey for the years 1987-1994, to study the effects of socioeconomic status (SES) on mortality and self-reported health. We find, consistent with previous studies, that the relationship between mortality and indicators such as education and income diminishes with age. We consider new explanations for this result and conclude that general biological deterioration at old age is probably the principal one. One important piece of evidence for this conclusion is the finding that there is no relationship at all between mortality and SES for people whose self-reported health status at baseline is either fair or poor. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Olga Kiuila & Peter Mieszkowski, 2007. "The effects of income, education and age on health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(8), pages 781-798.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:8:p:781-798
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1203
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1203
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anne Case & Angus S. Deaton, 2005. "Broken Down by Work and Sex: How Our Health Declines," NBER Chapters,in: Analyses in the Economics of Aging, pages 185-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1987:77:3:307-312_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Peter Adams & Michael D. Hurd & Daniel L. McFadden & Angela Merrill & Tiago Ribeiro, 2004. "Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise? Tests for Direct Causal Paths between Health and Socioeconomic Status," NBER Chapters,in: Perspectives on the Economics of Aging, pages 415-526 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Christian Salas, 2002. "On the empirical association between poor health and low socioeconomic status at old age," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 207-220.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Poças & Elias Soukiazis, 2010. "Health Status Determinants in the OECD Countries. A Panel Data Approach with Endogenous Regressors," GEMF Working Papers 2010-04, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    2. Hupfeld, Stefan, 2009. "Rich and healthy--better than poor and sick?: An empirical analysis of income, health, and the duration of the pension benefit spell," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 427-443, March.
    3. Athina Economou & Ioannis Theodossiou, 2011. "Poor And Sick: Estimating The Relationship Between Household Income And Health," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 57(3), pages 395-411, September.
    4. Petrie, Dennis & Allanson, Paul & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2011. "Accounting for the dead in the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1113-1123.
    5. Maite Blázquez & Elena Cottini & Ainhoa Herrarte, 2014. "The socioeconomic gradient in health: how important is material deprivation?," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(2), pages 239-264, June.
    6. Allanson, Paul & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Petrie, Dennis, 2010. "Longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 78-86, January.
    7. Lackó, Mária, 2010. "A magyarországi rossz egészségi állapot lehetséges magyarázó tényezői. Összehasonlító makroelemzés magyar és osztrák adatok alapján, 1960-2004
      [The poor health status of Hungarians: a comparative m
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 753-778.
    8. Alexander Silbersdorff & Julia Lynch & Stephan Klasen & Thomas Kneib, 2017. "Reconsidering the Income-Illness Relationship Using Distributional Regression: An Application to Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 931, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Boyle, Melissa A. & Lahey, Joanna N., 2010. "Health insurance and the labor supply decisions of older workers: Evidence from a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs expansion," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(7-8), pages 467-478, August.
    10. Melissa Boyle, 2008. "Costs and Benefits of Elderly Prescription Drug Coverage: Evidence from Veterans’ Health Care," Working Papers 0803, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.

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