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Learning from Experience? Evidence on the Impact and Distribution of Teacher Experience and the Implications for Teacher Policy

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  • Jennifer King Rice

    (Education Policy and Leadership, University of Maryland)

Abstract

Teacher experience has long been a central pillar of teacher workforce policies in U.S. school systems. The underlying assumption behind many of these policies is that experience promotes effectiveness, but is this really the case? What does existing evidence tell us about how, why, and for whom teacher experience matters? This policy brief distills the research on teacher experience into four general findings: (1) the effect of experience is most evident during the first few years of teaching; (2) the early-career experience effect varies by level of education and subject area; (3) inexperienced teachers are most likely to teach in high-poverty schools; and (4) the impact of experience differs for teachers in high- versus low-poverty schools. The brief concludes by discussing the implications of these findings for several key policy measures including teacher compensation, support and professional development, and the unequal distribution of teachers across schools. © 2013 Association for Education Finance and Policy

Suggested Citation

  • Jennifer King Rice, 2013. "Learning from Experience? Evidence on the Impact and Distribution of Teacher Experience and the Implications for Teacher Policy," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 8(3), pages 332-348, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:edfpol:v:8:y:2013:i:3:p:332-348
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jennifer King Rice, 2008. "From Highly Qualified to High Quality: An Imperative for Policy and Research to Recast the Teacher Mold," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 3(2), pages 151-164, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew A. Kraft & John P. Papay & Olivia L. Chi, 2020. "Teacher Skill Development: Evidence from Performance Ratings by Principals," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 39(2), pages 315-347, March.
    2. Papay, John P. & Kraft, Matthew A., 2015. "Productivity returns to experience in the teacher labor market: Methodological challenges and new evidence on long-term career improvement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 105-119.
    3. Brian Jacob & Jonah E. Rockoff & Eric S. Taylor & Benjamin Lindy & Rachel Rosen, 2016. "Teacher Applicant Hiring and Teacher Performance: Evidence from DC Public Schools," NBER Working Papers 22054, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Jacob, Brian A. & Rockoff, Jonah E. & Taylor, Eric S. & Lindy, Benjamin & Rosen, Rachel, 2018. "Teacher applicant hiring and teacher performance: Evidence from DC public schools," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 81-97.
    5. Jane Hannaway, 2015. "Shifting Boundaries and Shady Borders: A Call for Research on the Political Economy of Education Reform," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 10(3), pages 301-313, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    teacher experience; teacher policy;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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