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Consumers’ trust in government and their attitudes towards genetically modified food: empirical evidence from China

Author

Listed:
  • Huanguang Qiu
  • Jikun Huang
  • Carl Pray
  • Scott Rozelle

Abstract

Understanding the determinants of consumers’ acceptance towards genetically modified food (GMF) is critically important for the biotechnology industry. Based on a unique data set collected by the authors in 2002 and 2003 in 11 cities of China, an econometric model of consumers’ acceptance of GMF is estimated. The results show that consumers’ acceptance of GMF is high in urban China and consumers’ trust in government has a significantly positive effect on consumers’ acceptance of GMF. Our study also shows that failure to consider the endogeneity of consumers’ trust in government will lead to serious underestimation of its impacts on consumers’ acceptance of GMF. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study on the impact of consumers’ trust in government with consideration of the endogenous problems that often are encountered in consumer perception studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Huanguang Qiu & Jikun Huang & Carl Pray & Scott Rozelle, 2012. "Consumers’ trust in government and their attitudes towards genetically modified food: empirical evidence from China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 67-87, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:67-87
    DOI: 10.1080/14765284.2012.638471
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/14765284.2012.638471
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hallman, William K. & Hebden, W. Carl & Aquino, Helen L. & Cuite, Cara L. & Lang, John T., 2003. "Public Perceptions Of Genetically Modified Foods: A National Study Of American Knowledge And Opinion," Working Papers 18174, Rutgers University, Food Policy Institute.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amrita Chatterjee & Arpita Ghose, 2016. "Consumer’s Acceptance towards Genetically Modified Crops and Growth of the Economy: A Theoretical Approach," Working Papers 2016-137, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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