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Dynamic ethnic fractionalization and economic growth

Author

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  • Nauro Campos
  • Ahmad Saleh
  • Vitaliy Kuzeyev

Abstract

In their survey of the literature on ethnic fractionalization and economic performance, Alesina and La Ferrara (2005) identify two main directions for future research. One is to improve the measurement of diversity and the other to treat diversity as an endogenous variable. This paper tries to address these two issues: it investigates the effects of ethnic fractionalization on economic growth across countries using unique time-varying measures. We first replicate the finding of a weak effect of exogenous diversity on growth and then we show that accounting for how diversity changes over time and treating it as an endogenous variable makes a difference. Once diversity is instrumented (with lagged diversity and latitude), it shows a significant negative impact on economic growth which is robust to different specifications, polarization measures, econometric estimators, as well as to the use of an index of ethnic-religious-linguistic fractionalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Nauro Campos & Ahmad Saleh & Vitaliy Kuzeyev, 2011. "Dynamic ethnic fractionalization and economic growth," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 129-152.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:20:y:2011:i:2:p:129-152
    DOI: 10.1080/09638199.2011.538218
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Roodman, 2009. "How to do xtabond2: An introduction to difference and system GMM in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 9(1), pages 86-136, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Javier Gardeazabal, 2011. "Linguistic polarization and conflict in the Basque Country," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 405-425, December.
    2. Jülide Yildirim & Nadir Öcal, 2016. "Military expenditures, economic growth and spatial spillovers," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 87-104, February.
    3. Samantha Torrance & Oliver Morrissey, "undated". "Taxation and Indigenous Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Discussion Papers 14/04, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    4. Phanindra V. Wunnava & Aniruddha Mitra & Robert E. Prasch, 2015. "Globalization and the Ethnic Divide: Recent Longitudinal Evidence," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1475-1492, November.
    5. Elissaios Papyrakis & Pak Hung Mo, 2014. "Fractionalization, Polarization, And Economic Growth: Identifying The Transmission Channels," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 1204-1218, July.
    6. Elissaios Papyrakis, 2013. "Environmental Performance in Socially Fragmented Countries," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(1), pages 119-140, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ethnic diversity; fractionalization; polarization; growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • H1 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government

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