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The impact of export promotion institutions on trade: is it the intensive or the extensive margin?

  • Christian Volpe Martincus
  • Jeronimo Carballo
  • Andres Gallo

This article provides evidence on the channels through which export promotion institutions affect bilateral trade using a sample of Latin American and Caribbean countries over the period 1995 to 2004. We find that these institutions have a larger impact on the extensive margin of exports, especially in the case of trade promotion organizations.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 18 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 127-132

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:2:p:127-132
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  1. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2004. "Economic determinants of free trade agreements," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 29-63, October.
  2. Volpe Martincus, Christian & Carballo, Jerónimo, 2008. "Is export promotion effective in developing countries? Firm-level evidence on the intensive and the extensive margins of exports," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 89-106, September.
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