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Search and Deliberation in International Exchange: Learning from Multinational Trade About Lags, Distance Effects, and Home Bias

  • Subramanian Rangan
  • Robert Z. Lawrence

This paper compares the responses of intra- and extra-firm trade to exchange rate changes. It does so both to inform the debate on whether these responses are qualitatively different and to improve understanding of the microfoundations of features of trade behavior such as long adjustment lags, the large impact of distance, and the presence of significant home bias. We argue that the informational problems posed by search (acts identifying potential exchange partners) and deliberation (acts assessing their reliability and trustworthiness) play a key role in explaining these features and suggest that multinationals should have advantages in overcoming these problems. Indeed we find that the responses of multinationals to exchange rate changes are both larger and more rapid.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7012.

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Date of creation: Mar 1999
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7012
Note: ITI
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  1. Edward E. Leamer & James Levinsohn, 1994. "International Trade Theory: The Evidence," NBER Working Papers 4940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gordon, R.H. & Bovenberg, A.L., 1994. "Why is capital so immobile internationally? : Possible explanations and implications for capital income taxation," Discussion Paper 1994-63, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
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  11. Robert Z. Lawrence, 1990. "U.S. Current Account Adjustment: An Appraisal," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 21(2), pages 343-392.
  12. Gould, David M, 1994. "Immigrant Links to the Home Country: Empirical Implications for U.S. Bilateral Trade Flows," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 302-16, May.
  13. Dunning, John H & Rugman, Alan M, 1985. "The Influence of Hymer's Dissertation on the Theory of Foreign Direct Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 228-32, May.
  14. Krugman, Paul, 1995. "Increasing returns, imperfect competition and the positive theory of international trade," Handbook of International Economics, in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 24, pages 1243-1277 Elsevier.
  15. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
  16. Deardorff, A.V., 1995. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade : Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," Papers 95-05, Michigan - Center for Research on Economic & Social Theory.
  17. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-384649 is not listed on IDEAS
  18. Bovenberg, A.L. & Gordon, R.H., 1996. "Why is capital so immobile internationally? Possible explanation and implications for capital income taxation," Other publications TiSEM 6a131c21-fd9a-4d83-8d9a-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  19. Shang-Jin Wei, 1996. "Intra-National versus International Trade: How Stubborn are Nations in Global Integration?," NBER Working Papers 5531, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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