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Work Hours and Well Being: An Investigation of Moderator Effects

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  • Maria Pereira

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  • Filipe Coelho

    ()

Abstract

The relationship between work hours and subjective well being is marked by contradictory findings, thereby implying that it is far from being completely understood. A study of moderator effects can help explain variations in results across studies and, thus, overcome inconsistencies in past research. Accordingly, the current study aims to enlighten the relationship between work hours and well being by investigating how a number of variables moderate this relationship. To develop the research hypotheses concerning the moderator effects, this study relies mostly on social identity theory. Overall, the results suggest that work hours, per se, do not have a significant relationship with individual well being. Rather, their effects seem to depend on a number of issues, namely concerned with individuals’ objective characteristics, as well as their social identities. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Pereira & Filipe Coelho, 2013. "Work Hours and Well Being: An Investigation of Moderator Effects," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 235-253, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:111:y:2013:i:1:p:235-253
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-012-0002-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stacey A. Rich & Sharon Hanna & Bradley J. Wright, 2017. "Simply Satisfied: The Role of Psychological Need Satisfaction in the Life Satisfaction of Voluntary Simplifiers," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 89-105, February.
    2. Stephan Humpert, 2014. "Working time, satisfaction and work life balance: A European perspective," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 64(4), pages 3-17, October-D.
    3. Mark L. Bryan & Alita Nandi, 2018. "Working Hours, Work Identity and Subjective Wellbeing," Working Papers 2018002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    4. Bryan, Mark L. & Nandi, Alita, 2015. "Working hours, work identity and subjective wellbeing," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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