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Historical Research Approaches to the Analysis of Internationalisation

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  • Peter J. Buckley

    () (University of Leeds)

Abstract

Abstract Historical research methods and approaches can improve understanding of the most appropriate techniques to confront data and test theories in internationalisation research. A critical analysis of all “texts” (sources), time series analyses, comparative methods across time periods and space, counterfactual analysis and the examination of outliers are shown to have the potential to improve research practices. Examples and applications are shown in these key areas of research with special reference to internationalisation processes. Examination of these methods allows us to see internationalisation processes as a sequenced set of decisions in time and space, path dependent to some extent but subject to managerial discretion. Internationalisation process research can benefit from the use of historical research methods in analysis of sources, production of time-lines, using comparative evidence across time and space and in the examination of feasible alternative choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J. Buckley, 2016. "Historical Research Approaches to the Analysis of Internationalisation," Management International Review, Springer, vol. 56(6), pages 879-900, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:manint:v:56:y:2016:i:6:d:10.1007_s11575-016-0300-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s11575-016-0300-0
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