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Labour mobility and regional disparities: the role of female labour participation


  • Sjef Ederveen


  • Richard Nahuis
  • Ashok Parikh



Unemployment rates as well as income per capita differ vastly across the regions of Europe. Labour mobility can play a role in resolving regional disparities. This paper focuses on the questions why labour mobility is low in the EU and how it is possible that it remains low. We explore whether changes in male and female labour participation act as an important alternative adjustment mechanism. We answer this question in the affirmative. We argue that female labour participation is very important in adjusting to regional disparities.
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Suggested Citation

  • Sjef Ederveen & Richard Nahuis & Ashok Parikh, 2007. "Labour mobility and regional disparities: the role of female labour participation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 895-913, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:20:y:2007:i:4:p:895-913
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-006-0095-6

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Paul J. Devereux, 2004. "Changes in Relative Wages and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
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    10. Aslan Zorlu & Joop Hartog, 2000. "The Effect of Immigration on Native Earnings," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 00-015/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Pissarides, Christopher A & McMaster, Ian, 1990. "Regional Migration, Wages and Unemployment: Empirical Evidence and Implications for Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(4), pages 812-831, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristiano Perugini & Gaetano Martino, 2008. "Income Inequality Within European Regions: Determinants And Effects On Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(3), pages 373-406, September.
    2. Fredrik Carlsen & Kåre Johansen & Lasse Sigbjørn Stambøl, 2013. "Effects of Regional Labour Markets on Migration Flows, by Education Level," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 27(1), pages 80-92, March.
    3. Baycan, T. & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "A socio-economic impact analysis of cultural diversity," Serie Research Memoranda 0012, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    4. Arntz, Melanie & Gregory, Terry & Lehmer, Florian, 2011. "Unequal pay or unequal employment? What drives the skill-composition of labor flows in Germany?," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-074, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Michela Martinoia, 2011. "European Integration, Labour Market Dynamics and Migration Flows," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 8(1), pages 97-127, June.
    6. Tüzin Baycan & Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "A socio-economic impact analysis of urban cultural diversity: pathways and horizons," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 5, pages 175-202 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item


    Labour mobility; European Union; Panel data methods; F22; J61; C33;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models


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