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Endogenous risk-taking and physical appearance of sex workers

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  • Peter Egger

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  • Andreas Lindenblatt

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Abstract

Previous research found that physical appearance affects the risk-taking of sex workers through offering unprotected services. This paper utilizes a large individual-level data set covering 16,583 pay-for-sex contracts in 2011 and 2012 by 2,517 female suppliers in Germany. Results based on instrumental variables suggest that the incentive for risk-taking is about twice as high than when assuming random assignment of risk-taking. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Egger & Andreas Lindenblatt, 2015. "Endogenous risk-taking and physical appearance of sex workers," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(9), pages 941-949, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:16:y:2015:i:9:p:941-949
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-014-0640-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chang, Hung-Hao & Weng, Yungho, 2012. "What is more important for prostitute price? Physical appearance or risky sex behavior?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 480-483.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:scotjp:v:65:y:2018:i:5:p:528-549 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alexander Muravyev & Oleksandr Talavera, 2018. "Unsafe Sex in the City: Risk Pricing in the London Area," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 65(5), pages 528-549, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sexual workers; Risk-taking; Health economics; I10; J01; J70; J71;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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