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Sick of being “Activated?”

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  • Barbara Hofmann

    ()

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    Do unemployment insurance (UI) benefit recipients take sick leave more often when facing “activation” by the employment office? We answer this question using administrative data from the German Federal Employment Agency on vacancy referrals sent to UI benefit recipients. Applying duration analysis, we find an increased transition rate into short-term sick leave among individuals who had received vacancy referrals from the employment office. We find that while men on average report less sick compared to women, they respond stronger to a vacancy referral. In subsequent steps, we test the hypothesis that the results are driven by real illnesses as opposed to shirking. Our findings do not support this hypothesis. We interpret the findings as evidence of moral hazard behavior and as evidence of a side effect of an activation measure. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00181-013-0761-y
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirical Economics.

    Volume (Year): 47 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 3 (November)
    Pages: 1103-1127

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:47:y:2014:i:3:p:1103-1127
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-013-0761-y
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