IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of origin community characteristics on rural-urban out-migration in a developing country


  • Richard Bilsborrow
  • Thomas McDevitt
  • Sherrie Kossoudji
  • Richard Fuller


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Bilsborrow & Thomas McDevitt & Sherrie Kossoudji & Richard Fuller, 1987. "The impact of origin community characteristics on rural-urban out-migration in a developing country," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(2), pages 191-210, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:24:y:1987:i:2:p:191-210
    DOI: 10.2307/2061629

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    2. Richard A. Easterlin, 1980. "Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number east80-1, January.
    3. Bilsborrow RE., 1981. "Surveys of internal migration in low-income countries: the need for and content of community-level variables," ILO Working Papers 992114393402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. Anderson, Dennis & Leiserson, Mark W, 1980. "Rural Nonfarm Employment in Developing Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 227-248, January.
    5. Richard Easterlin, 1980. "Introduction to "Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries"," NBER Chapters,in: Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Bravo-Ureta, B. & Ely, R.D. & Pelto, P.J. & Meneses, L. & Allen, L.H. & Pelto, G.H. & Chavez, A., 1989. "Determinants of Rural-to-Urban Labour Movements in Mexico: Household Perspective," Occasional Paper Series No. 5 197707, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Michael A. Clemens, 2014. "Does development reduce migration?," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 6, pages 152-185 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Ashley Poston & Brian E. Whitacre, 2014. "How Specialized is “Too” Specialized? Outmigration and Industry Diversification in Nonmetropolitan Counties across America," Journal of Economic Insight (formerly the Journal of Economics (MVEA)), Missouri Valley Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 37-63.
    4. Beauchemin, Cris & Schoumaker, Bruno, 2005. "Migration to cities in Burkina Faso: Does the level of development in sending areas matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1129-1152, July.
    5. Lawrence Brown & Andrew Goetz, 1987. "Development-related contextual effects and individual attributes in third world migration processes: A Venezuelan example," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(4), pages 497-516, November.
    6. Adams, Richard H., Jr., 1991. "The effects of international remittances on poverty, inequality, and development in rural Egypt:," Research reports 86, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Williams, Nathaniel J. & Jaramillo, Paulina & Taneja, Jay & Ustun, Taha Selim, 2015. "Enabling private sector investment in microgrid-based rural electrification in developing countries: A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1268-1281.
    8. Peter Mueser, 1989. "Measuring the impact of locational characteristics on migration: Interpreting cross-sectional analyses," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(3), pages 499-513, August.
    9. Michael Clemens, 2014. "Does Development Reduce Migration? - Working Paper 359," Working Papers 359, Center for Global Development.
    10. Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay & Elliott Green, 2013. "Urbanization and Mortality Decline," Working Papers 46, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
    11. Clark Gray & Richard Bilsborrow, 2013. "Environmental Influences on Human Migration in Rural Ecuador," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(4), pages 1217-1241, August.
    12. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0588-9 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:24:y:1987:i:2:p:191-210. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.