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China’s socioeconomic risk from extreme events in a changing climate: a hierarchical Bayesian model

Author

Listed:
  • Xiao-Chen Yuan

    (Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT)
    Beijing Institute of Technology)

  • Xun Sun

    (Columbia University)

  • Upmanu Lall

    (Columbia University
    Columbia University)

  • Zhi-Fu Mi

    (Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT)
    Beijing Institute of Technology)

  • Jun He

    (Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Yi-Ming Wei

    () (Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT)
    Beijing Institute of Technology)

Abstract

Abstract China has a large economic and demographic exposure to extreme events that is increasing rapidly due to its fast development, and climate change may further aggravate the situation. This paper investigates China’s socioeconomic risk from extreme events under climate change over the next few decades with a focus on sub-national heterogeneity. The empirical relationships between socioeconomic damages and their determinants are identified using a hierarchical Bayesian approach, and are used to estimate future damages as well as associated uncertainty bounds given specified climate and development scenarios. Considering projected changes in exposure, we find that the southwest and central regions and Hainan Island of China are likely to have a larger percentage of population at risk, while most of the southwest and central regions could generally have higher economic losses. Finally, the analysis suggests that increasing income can significantly decrease the number of people affected by extremes.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiao-Chen Yuan & Xun Sun & Upmanu Lall & Zhi-Fu Mi & Jun He & Yi-Ming Wei, 2016. "China’s socioeconomic risk from extreme events in a changing climate: a hierarchical Bayesian model," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 139(2), pages 169-181, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:139:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s10584-016-1749-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-016-1749-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhi-Fu Mi & Yi-Ming Wei & Bing Wang & Jing Meng & Zhu Liu & Yuli Shan & Jingru Liu & Dabo Guan, 2017. "Socioeconomic impact assessment of China's CO2 emissions peak prior to 2030," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 103, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General

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