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The Tuvalu Syndrome

  • Adam Millard-Ball

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10584-011-0102-0
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Climatic Change.

    Volume (Year): 110 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (February)
    Pages: 1047-1066

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:110:y:2012:i:3:p:1047-1066
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/10584

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    1. O. Boucher & J. Lowe & C. Jones, 2009. "Implications of delayed actions in addressing carbon dioxide emission reduction in the context of geo-engineering," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 92(3), pages 261-273, February.
    2. Barrett, Scott & Stavins, Robert, 2002. "Increasing Participation and Compliance in International Climate Change Agreements," Working Paper Series rwp02-031, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Scott Barrett, 2008. "The Incredible Economics of Geoengineering," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 39(1), pages 45-54, January.
    4. Barrett, Scott, 2005. "The theory of international environmental agreements," Handbook of Environmental Economics, in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1457-1516 Elsevier.
    5. Porchiung Chou & Cheickna Sylla, 2008. "The formation of an international environmental agreement as a two-stage exclusive cartel formation game with transferable utilities," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 317-341, December.
    6. David G. Victor, 2008. "On the regulation of geoengineering," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 322-336, Summer.
    7. Aldy, Joseph & Barrett, Scott & Stavins, Robert, 2003. "Thirteen Plus One: A Comparison of Global Climate Policy Architectures," Working Paper Series rwp03-012, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    8. Barrett, Scott, 1997. "The strategy of trade sanctions in international environmental agreements," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 345-361, November.
    9. Finus, Michael, 2008. "Game Theoretic Research on the Design of International Environmental Agreements: Insights, Critical Remarks, and Future Challenges," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 2(1), pages 29-67, June.
    10. Finus, Michael & Sáiz, M. Elena & Hendrix, Eligius M.T., 2009. "An empirical test of new developments in coalition theory for the design of international environmental agreements," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(01), pages 117-137, February.
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