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An empirical test of new developments in coalition theory for the design of international environmental agreements




We consider new developments in coalition theory for the design of international environmental agreements (IEAs). Applying an empirical model on climate change that comprises benefit and cost estimates from abatement for 12 world regions, we analyze how the design of an agreement affects the success of self-enforcing IEAs. We analyze single versus multiple coalitions, open versus exclusive membership with majority and unanimity voting, and no transfers versus transfers with four different transfer schemes.

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  • Finus, Michael & Sáiz, M. Elena & Hendrix, Eligius M.T., 2009. "An empirical test of new developments in coalition theory for the design of international environmental agreements," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(01), pages 117-137, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:14:y:2009:i:01:p:117-137_00

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Evstigneev, I.V. & Flam, S.D., 2000. "Sharing Nonconvex Costs," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 1300, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
    2. Ermoliev, Yuri & Klaassen, Ger & Nentjes, Andries, 1996. "Adaptive Cost-Effective Ambient Charges under Incomplete Information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 37-48, July.
    3. Kolstad, Charles D. & Guzman, Rolando M., 1999. "Information and the Divergence between Willingness to Accept and Willingness to Pay," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 66-80, July.
    4. Evstigneev, I.V. & Flam, S.D., 2000. "Stochastic Programming: Non-Anticipativity and Lagrange Multipliers," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 1100, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
    5. Shapley, Lloyd S. & Shubik, Martin, 1969. "On market games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 9-25, June.
    6. Dixit, Avinash & Pindyck, Robert S & Sodal, Sigbjorn, 1999. "A Markup Interpretation of Optimal Investment Rules," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(455), pages 179-189, April.
    7. Y. Ermoliev & M. Michalevich & A. Nentjes, 2000. "Markets for Tradeable Emission and Ambient Permits: A Dynamic Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 15(1), pages 39-56, January.
    8. Arrow, Kenneth J & Lind, Robert C, 1970. "Uncertainty and the Evaluation of Public Investment Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(3), pages 364-378, June.
    9. Magill, Michael & Shafer, Wayne, 1991. "Incomplete markets," Handbook of Mathematical Economics,in: W. Hildenbrand & H. Sonnenschein (ed.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 30, pages 1523-1614 Elsevier.
    10. Ermoliev, Yu. & Keyzer, M. A. & Norkin, V., 2000. "Global convergence of the stochastic tatonnement process," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 173-190, October.
    11. Henry, Claude, 1974. "Investment Decisions Under Uncertainty: The "Irreversibility Effect."," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(6), pages 1006-1012, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adam Millard-Ball, 2012. "The Tuvalu Syndrome," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 1047-1066, February.
    2. Michael Finus & Bianca Rundshagen & Johan Eyckmans, 2014. "Simulating a sequential coalition formation process for the climate change problem: first come, but second served?," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 220(1), pages 5-23, September.
    3. Carlo Carraro & Johan Eyckmans & Michael Finus, 2006. "Optimal transfers and participation decisions in international environmental agreements," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 1(4), pages 379-396, December.
    4. repec:spr:ieaple:v:17:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10784-017-9351-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Meißner, Nathalie, 2013. "The incentives of private companies to invest in protected area certificates: How coalitions can improve ecosystem sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 148-158.
    6. Vale, Petterson Molina, 2016. "The changing climate of climate change economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 12-19.
    7. M Sáiz & Eligius Hendrix & Niels Olieman, 2006. "On the Computation of Stability in Multiple Coalition Formation Games," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 251-275, October.

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