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Education and Redistribution

  • Gianni De Fraja


    (University of Leicester and CEPR, Londra)

Education is a very expensive way of carrying out redistributive policies. This is because those who have been more favoured by nature/luck are also those who benefit most from the investment in education: if educational resources are distributed according to the ability to benefit, as efficiency would require, the better off should receive more, which is clearly inequitable. Some counterintuitive features of the provision of education can be understood in terms of this conflict between equity and efficiency: electoral preferences for the provision of university subsidies, the distributive consequences of admission tests, and the interaction between house prices and the quality of schools.

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Article provided by SIPI Spa in its journal Rivista di Politica Economica.

Volume (Year): 94 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 (May-June)
Pages: 3-44

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Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:94:y:2004:i:3:p:3-44
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