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On the robustness of balance statistics with respect to nonresponse

Listed author(s):
  • Christian Seiler

A general problem for survey conductors is the fact that the response decision can be connected to the intended answer of the non-respondents. This nonresponse bias might have a substantial effect on the aggregated results. In this paper, a participation framework for the widely used business cycle balance statistics indicators is examined. An extensive simulation study is performed to analyse their effects. The analyses show that these indicators are extremely stable towards nonresponse biases.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/jbcma-2014-5jrxqbwcjdr3
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Article provided by OECD Publishing, Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys in its journal OECD Journal: Journal of Business Cycle Measurement and Analysis.

Volume (Year): 2014 (2015)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 45-62

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Handle: RePEc:oec:stdkab:5jrxqbwcjdr3
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  1. Kholodilin Konstantin Arkadievich & Siliverstovs Boriss, 2006. "On the Forecasting Properties of the Alternative Leading Indicators for the German GDP: Recent Evidence," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 226(3), pages 234-259, June.
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