IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oec/dafkad/5js3bfznx6vj.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Why implicit bank debt guarantees matter: Some empirical evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Oliver Denk
  • Sebastian Schich
  • Boris Cournède

Abstract

What are the economic effects of implicit bank debt guarantees and who ultimately benefits from them? This paper finds that “financial excesses” – situations where bank credit reaches levels that reduce economic growth – have been stronger in OECD countries characterised by larger values of implicit guarantees and where bank creditors have not incurred losses in bank failure resolution cases. Also, implicit bank debt guarantees benefit financial sector employees and other high-income earners in two ways, increasing income inequality. First, implicit guarantees are likely to raise financial sector pay. This is consistent with the observation of “financial sector wage premia”, or financial sector employees earning in excess of their profile in terms of age, education and other characteristics. Second, implicit guarantees are likely to result in more and cheaper bank lending. If so, well-off people tend to benefit relatively more since household credit is more unequally distributed than income. JEL classification: D63, E43, G21, G28, O47 Keywords: Bank funding costs, implicit guarantees for bank debt, bank failure resolution, finance and growth, finance and income inequality

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver Denk & Sebastian Schich & Boris Cournède, 2015. "Why implicit bank debt guarantees matter: Some empirical evidence," OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2014(2), pages 63-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:dafkad:5js3bfznx6vj
    DOI: 10.1787/fmt-2014-5js3bfznx6vj
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1787/fmt-2014-5js3bfznx6vj
    Download Restriction: Full text available to READ online. PDF download available to OECD iLibrary subscribers.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1787/fmt-2014-5js3bfznx6vj?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Magda, Iga & Rycx, Francois & Tojerow, Ilan & Valsamis, Daphné, 2008. "Wage Differentials across Sectors in Europe: An East-West Comparison," IZA Discussion Papers 3830, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Edward J. Kane & Luc Laeven, 2014. "Deposit Insurance Database," NBER Working Papers 20278, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sebastian Schich & Byoung-Hwan Kim, 2013. "Developments in the value of implicit guarantees for bank debt: The role of resolution regimes and practices," OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2012(2), pages 35-65.
    4. Philip Du Caju & Gábor Kátay & Ana Lamo & Daphne Nicolitsas & Steven Poelhekke, 2010. "Inter-Industry Wage Differentials In EU Countries: What Do Cross-Country Time Varying Data Add to the Picture?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(2-3), pages 478-486, 04-05.
    5. Adrian Blundell-Wignall & Paul Atkinson, 2012. "Deleveraging, Traditional versus Capital Markets Banking and the Urgent Need to Separate and Recapitalise G-SIFI Banks," OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2012(1), pages 7-44.
    6. Abdul Abiad & Enrica Detragiache & Thierry Tressel, 2010. "A New Database of Financial Reforms," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 57(2), pages 281-302, June.
    7. Sebastian Schich & Sofia Lindh, 2012. "Implicit guarantees for bank debt: where do we stand?," OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2012(1), pages 45-63.
    8. Sebastian Schich, 2013. "How to reduce implicit bank debt guarantees?: A framework for discussing bank regulatory reform," Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 308-318, November.
    9. Arnold, Jens & Bassanini, Andrea & Scarpetta, Stefano, 2011. "Solow or Lucas? Testing speed of convergence on a panel of OECD countries," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 110-123, June.
    10. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    11. Caselli, Francesco & Esquivel, Gerardo & Lefort, Fernando, 1996. "Reopening the Convergence Debate: A New Look at Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 363-389, September.
    12. Sebastian Schich & Michiel Bijlsma & Remco Mocking, 2014. "Improving the monitoring of the value of implicit guarantees for bank debt," OECD Journal: Financial Market Trends, OECD Publishing, vol. 2014(1), pages 7-37.
    13. Beck, Roland & Georgiadis, Georgios & Straub, Roland, 2014. "The finance and growth nexus revisited," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(3), pages 382-385.
    14. Iga Magda & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow & Daphné Valsamis, 2011. "Wage differentials across sectors in Europe," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(4), pages 749-769, October.
    15. Stephen Cecchetti & Enisse Kharroubi, 2012. "Reassessing the impact of finance on growth," BIS Working Papers 381, Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Oliver Denk, 2015. "Financial sector pay and labour income inequality: Evidence from Europe," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1225, OECD Publishing.
    17. Bennett, Rosalind L. & Hwa, Vivian & Kwast, Myron L., 2015. "Market discipline by bank creditors during the 2008–2010 crisis," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 51-69.
    18. Leonardo Gambacorta & Jing Yang & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2014. "Financial structure and growth," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    19. Martins, Pedro S., 2004. "Industry wage premia: evidence from the wage distribution," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 157-163, May.
    20. Law, Siong Hook & Singh, Nirvikar, 2014. "Does too much finance harm economic growth?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 36-44.
    21. Hsu, Po-Hsuan & Tian, Xuan & Xu, Yan, 2014. "Financial development and innovation: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 116-135.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Oliver Denk & Boris Cournède, 2015. "Finance and income inequality in OECD countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1224, OECD Publishing.
    2. Aida Caldera Sánchez & Alain de Serres & Filippo Gori & Mikkel Hermansen & Oliver Röhn, 2017. "Strengthening economic resilience: Insights from the post-1970 record of severe recessions and financial crises," OECD Economic Policy Papers 20, OECD Publishing.
    3. Boris Cournède & Catherine L. Mann, 2018. "Growth and Inequality Effects of Decades of Financial Transformation in OECD Countries," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 60(1), pages 3-14, March.
    4. Boris Cournède & Oliver Denk & Peter Hoeller, 2015. "Finance and Inclusive Growth," OECD Economic Policy Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
    5. Oliver Denk, 2015. "Financial sector pay and labour income inequality: Evidence from Europe," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1225, OECD Publishing.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Boris Cournède & Oliver Denk & Peter Hoeller, 2015. "Finance and Inclusive Growth," OECD Economic Policy Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
    2. Alessio Ciarlone, 2019. "The relationship between financial development and growth: the case of emerging Europe," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 521, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Emmanuel Carré & Guillaume L’œillet, 2018. "The Literature on the Finance–Growth Nexus in the Aftermath of the Financial Crisis: A Review," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 60(1), pages 161-180, March.
    4. Evangelia Papapetrou & Pinelopi Tsalaporta, 2016. "Inter-industry wage differentials in Greece: rent-sharing and unobserved heterogeneity hypotheses," Working Papers 213, Bank of Greece.
    5. Aida Caldera Sánchez & Filippo Gori, 2016. "Can Reforms Promoting Growth Increase Financial Fragility?: An Empirical Assessment," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1340, OECD Publishing.
    6. Oliver Denk, 2015. "Financial sector pay and labour income inequality: Evidence from Europe," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1225, OECD Publishing.
    7. Fajeau, Maxime, 2021. "Too much finance or too many weak instruments?," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 14-36.
    8. Evangelia Papapetrou & Pinelopi Tsalaporta, 2017. "Inter-Industry Wage Differentials in Greece: Evidence from Quantile Regression Analysis," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 51-67, January.
    9. Zhenxiong Li & Hilary Ingham, 2020. "Financial Development, Economic Performance and Democracy," Working Papers 291296033, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    10. Oliver Denk & Boris Cournède, 2015. "Finance and income inequality in OECD countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1224, OECD Publishing.
    11. Philip Du Caju & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2011. "Inter‐Industry Wage Differentials: How Much Does Rent Sharing Matter?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(4), pages 691-717, July.
    12. Nahla Samargandi & Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh, 2014. "Is the Relationship between Financial Development and Economic Growth Monotonic? Evidence from a Sample of Middle Income Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 4743, CESifo.
    13. Faroque Ahmed & Md. Jamal Hossain & Mohammad Tareque, 2020. "Investigating the Roles of Physical Infrastructure, Financial Development and Human Capital on Economic Growth in Bangladesh," Journal of Infrastructure Development, India Development Foundation, vol. 12(2), pages 154-175, December.
    14. Pop Silaghi, Monica Ioana & Alexa, Diana & Jude, Cristina & Litan, Cristian, 2014. "Do business and public sector research and development expenditures contribute to economic growth in Central and Eastern European Countries? A dynamic panel estimation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 108-119.
    15. Jérôme Creel & Paul Hubert & Fabien Labondance, 2017. "Financialisation Risks and Econmic Performance," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2017-21, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    16. Ng, Adam & Dewandaru, Ginanjar & Ibrahim, Mansor H., 2015. "Property rights and the stock market-growth nexus," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 48-63.
    17. Chu, Lan Khanh & Chu, Hung Viet, 2020. "Is too much liquidity harmful to economic growth?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 230-242.
    18. Cheah, Chee Keong & Masih, Mansur, 2017. "Does the growth of islamic bank financing depend on stock market growth? evidence from Malaysia," MPRA Paper 106192, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Du Caju, Philip & Rycx, Francois & Tojerow, Ilan, 2008. "Rent-Sharing and the Cyclicality of Wage Differentials," IZA Discussion Papers 3844, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    20. Cavallaro, Eleonora & Villani, Ilaria, 2021. "Real income convergence and the patterns of financial integration in the EU," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank funding costs; implicit guarantees for bank debt; bank failure resolution; finance and growth; finance and income inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oec:dafkad:5js3bfznx6vj. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/oecddfr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/oecddfr.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.