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A random utility maximization (RUM) based dynamic activity scheduling model: Application in weekend activity scheduling

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  • Khandker Habib

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  • Khandker Habib, 2011. "A random utility maximization (RUM) based dynamic activity scheduling model: Application in weekend activity scheduling," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 123-151, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:38:y:2011:i:1:p:123-151
    DOI: 10.1007/s11116-010-9294-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tomás Ruiz & Harry Timmermans, 2006. "Changing the timing of activities in resolving Scheduling Conflicts," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(5), pages 429-445, September.
    2. Falaris, Evangelos M, 1987. "A Nested Logit Migration Model with Selectivity," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 28(2), pages 429-443, June.
    3. Nurul Habib, Khandker M. & Day, Nicholas & Miller, Eric J., 2009. "An investigation of commuting trip timing and mode choice in the Greater Toronto Area: Application of a joint discrete-continuous model," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 639-653, August.
    4. Cinzia Cirillo & Kay Axhausen, 2010. "Dynamic model of activity-type choice and scheduling," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 15-38, January.
    5. Ming Lee & Michael McNally, 2006. "An empirical investigation on the dynamic processes of activity scheduling and trip chaining," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(6), pages 553-565, November.
    6. Khandker Habib & Eric Miller, 2008. "Modelling daily activity program generation considering within-day and day-to-day dynamics in activity-travel behaviour," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 467-484, July.
    7. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521747387, April.
    8. Ram Pendyala & Chandra Bhat, 2004. "An Exploration of the Relationship between Timing and Duration of Maintenance Activities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 429-456, November.
    9. Chandra Bhat & Rajul Misra, 1999. "Discretionary activity time allocation of individuals between in-home and out-of-home and between weekdays and weekends," Transportation, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 193-229, May.
    10. Roorda, Matthew J. & Miller, Eric J. & Habib, Khandker M.N., 2008. "Validation of TASHA: A 24-h activity scheduling microsimulation model," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 360-375, February.
    11. Bhat, Chandra R., 2005. "A multiple discrete-continuous extreme value model: formulation and application to discretionary time-use decisions," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 679-707, September.
    12. Sean Doherty & Eric Miller, 2000. "A computerized household activity scheduling survey," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 75-97, February.
    13. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1995. "Activity, Travel, and the Allocation of Time," Working Papers 199505, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Khandker M. Nurul Habib & Vivian Hui, 2017. "An activity-based approach of investigating travel behaviour of older people," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 555-573, May.
    2. Sheila Ferrer & Tomás Ruiz, 2017. "Comparison on travel scheduling between driving and walking trips by habitual car users," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 27-48, January.
    3. Blom Västberg, Oskar & Karlström, Anders & Jonsson, Daniel & Sundberg, Marcus, 2016. "Including time in a travel demand model using dynamic discrete choice," MPRA Paper 75336, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Nov 2016.
    4. Nurul Habib, Khandker & El-Assi, Wafic & Hasnine, Md. Sami & Lamers, James, 2017. "Daily activity-travel scheduling behaviour of non-workers in the National Capital Region (NCR) of Canada," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 1-16.
    5. Dane, Gamze & Arentze, Theo A. & Timmermans, Harry J.P. & Ettema, Dick, 2014. "Simultaneous modeling of individuals’ duration and expenditure decisions in out-of-home leisure activities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 93-103.

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