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The impact of cigarette quitting during pregnancy on other prenatal health behaviors

  • George Wehby


  • Allen Wilcox
  • Rolv Lie
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    Several economic studies have evaluated the effects of cigarette smoking and quitting on other health behaviors such as alcohol use and weight gain. However, there is little research that evaluates the effects of cigarette quitting during pregnancy on other health behaviors such as caloric intake, alcohol consumption, multivitamin use, and caffeine intake. In this paper, we evaluate these effects and employ a genetic variant that predicts cigarette quitting to aid in identification. We find some evidence that cigarette quitting during pregnancy may increase multivitamin use and caloric intake and reduce caffeine consumption. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 211-233

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:11:y:2013:i:2:p:211-233
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    1. George L. Wehby & Kaitlin Prater & Ann Marie McCarthy & Eduardo E. Castilla & Jeffrey C. Murray, 2011. "The Impact of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy on Early Child Neurodevelopment," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 207 - 254.
    2. Tauchmann, Harald & Göhlmann, Silja & Requate, Till & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2008. "Tobacco and Alcohol: Complements or Substitutes? A Structural Model Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 3412, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Diana S. Lien & William N. Evans, 2005. "Estimating the Impact of Large Cigarette Tax Hikes: The Case of Maternal Smoking and Infant Birth Weight," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    4. George Wehby & Charles J. Courtemanche, 2012. "The Heterogeneity of the Cigarette Price Effect on Body Mass Index," NBER Working Papers 18087, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Rees, Daniel I. & Sabia, Joseph J., 2010. "Body weight and smoking initiation: Evidence from Add Health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 774-777, September.
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    7. Wehby, George L. & Murray, Jeffrey C. & Castilla, Eduardo E. & Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S. & Ohsfeldt, Robert L., 2009. "Prenatal care demand and its effects on birth outcomes by birth defect status in Argentina," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 84-95, March.
    8. Edward C Norton & Euna Han, 2007. "Genetic Information, Obesity, and Labor Market Outcomes," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/15, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Shin-Yi Chou & Michael Grossman & Henry Saffer, 2002. "An Economic Analysis of Adult Obesity: Results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," NBER Working Papers 9247, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder & George Davey Smith & Debbie A. Lawlor & Carol Propper & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Mendelian randomization: the use of genes in instrumental variable analyses," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 893-896, 08.
    11. Cawley, John & Markowitz, Sara & Tauras, John, 2004. "Lighting up and slimming down: the effects of body weight and cigarette prices on adolescent smoking initiation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 293-311, March.
    12. William N. Evans & Jeanne S. Ringel, 1997. "Can Higher Cigarette Taxes Improve Birth Outcomes?," NBER Working Papers 5998, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Ding, Weili & Lehrer, Steven F. & Rosenquist, J.Niels & Audrain-McGovern, Janet, 2009. "The impact of poor health on academic performance: New evidence using genetic markers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 578-597, May.
    14. Sandra L. Decker & Amy Ellen Schwartz, 2000. "Cigarettes and Alcohol: Substitutes or Complements?," NBER Working Papers 7535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. John Cawley & Euna Han & Edward C. Norton, 2011. "The validity of genes related to neurotransmitters as instrumental variables," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 884-888, 08.
    16. Wehby, George L. & Murray, Jeffrey C. & Wilcox, Allen & Lie, Rolv T., 2012. "Smoking and body weight: Evidence using genetic instruments," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 113-126.
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