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The Impact of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy on Early Child Neurodevelopment

  • George L. Wehby
  • Kaitlin Prater
  • Ann Marie McCarthy
  • Eduardo E. Castilla
  • Jeffrey C. Murray
Registered author(s):

    Early child neurodevelopment has major impacts on future human capital and health. However, not much is known about the impacts of prenatal risk factors on child neurodevelopment. We evaluate the effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on child neurodevelopment between 3 months and 24 months of age and interactions with socioeconomic status (SES). We employ data from a unique sample of children from South America. Smoking has large adverse effects on neurodevelopment, with larger effects in the low-SES sample. Our results highlight the importance of early interventions beginning before and during pregnancy for enhancing child development and future human capital attainment.

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/660885
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/660885
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

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    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Human Capital.

    Volume (Year): 5 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 207 - 254

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:doi:10.1086/660885
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JHC/

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