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Violating the Monotonicity condition for instrumental variable—Dimorphic patterns of gene–behavior association

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  • Fang, Muriel Zheng

Abstract

I document the dimorphic patterns for the association between DAT1 9R9R genotype and measures of risky behaviors including drinking, use of marijuana, cocaine, other drugs, and number of sexual partners. The associations between DAT1 9R9R genotype and risky behaviors are often in opposite signs for females and males, in the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Add Health). This article sensitizes the researcher on the sexual dimorphic pattern of gene–behavior association, and its risk to violate the Monotonicity (no-defiers) condition in applications that use genetic markers as instrumental variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Fang, Muriel Zheng, 2014. "Violating the Monotonicity condition for instrumental variable—Dimorphic patterns of gene–behavior association," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 59-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:122:y:2014:i:1:p:59-63
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.10.038
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edward C. Norton & Euna Han, 2008. "Genetic information, obesity, and labor market outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(9), pages 1089-1104, September.
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    3. John Cawley & Euna Han & Edward C. Norton, 2011. "The validity of genes related to neurotransmitters as instrumental variables," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 884-888, August.
    4. Fletcher, Jason M. & Lehrer, Steven F., 2011. "Genetic lotteries within families," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 647-659, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monotonicity; Genetic instrumental variable; Dimorphic pattern;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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